What is this?

What is this?

Postby Rob M » Tue Mar 03, 2015 11:42 pm

I found this 3d model on the web without any description. Before I get any crazy ideas (too late), What is it?

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Last edited by Rob M on Wed May 02, 2018 5:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: What is this?

Postby Tom Dempsey » Wed Mar 04, 2015 12:51 am

F-3 possibly. Except however drew it is looking at a present day one based on the crude roller bearings and fairly modern speedometer pickup. I don't think it's done baking yet, at any rate.
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Re: What is this?

Postby DKRickman » Wed Mar 04, 2015 4:23 am

Also, it looks like the windshield in the drawing is curved. I don't know of any North American locomotives with curved windshields, and I know the F units had flat glass.

It's interesting, because some aspects of the model (like the pilot) are very well executed, and others (like the trucks) are remarkably crude by comparison.
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Re: What is this?

Postby scaro » Wed Mar 04, 2015 4:41 am

looks like an F7.
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Re: What is this?

Postby Richard-B » Wed Mar 04, 2015 11:01 am

For comparison... here is Rapido's FL9 for HO-scale
http://www.rapidotrains.com/fl9_3.html
I'm pretty sure it is spot-on.
4f.jpg
Rapido FL9
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Re: What is this?

Postby areibel » Wed Mar 04, 2015 12:08 pm

I'd guess an F7 as well without knowing the wheelbase. The only big difference is the air grille running along the top, the F7 had one of two types and the fans look like the later low ones (like the Lionels). The F3 grille was more open, with the "chicken wire" covering and you can see the structure behind them.. But it is interesting, they did a great job on the pilot. The windshield center post looks too wide, and the glass should be flat but they did a very nice job on the curve above the windowswhere it transitions to the roof- that's a problem on all the other TT F units. But the windows themselves look to be about the right height. And I can't really tell, the nose might be a hair short but overall it's an excellent start!
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Re: What is this?

Postby Rob M » Wed Mar 04, 2015 12:19 pm

DKRickman wrote:Also, it looks like the windshield in the drawing is curved. I don't know of any North American locomotives with curved windshields, and I know the F units had flat glass.

Well that's not good but maybe I can flatten them out.

I think I read somewhere that the basic nose shape on all f3 and newer f-units and all e-units were the same. The only difference was the placing of markers and various other minor details.
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Re: What is this?

Postby Richard-B » Wed Mar 04, 2015 1:50 pm

Rob M wrote:I think I read somewhere that the basic nose shape on all f3 and newer f-units and all e-units were the same. The only difference was the placing of markers and various other minor details.
I also believe this is true...
but any 'same-ness' was necessarily limited by the fact that photos show these panels were hand-beaten into shape at EMD over the metal frame structure.

I've also heard that noses were swapped from F-units in the deadline to others that had been damaged in-service, without regard for the vintage. Nose doors were were similarly swapped... sometimes changing the number of headlights.

What was actually provided IN the headlight(s) housing was also a buyer option... with plain, Mars, or Gyra-lights all available.

I think the number boards enclosures are another distinguishing feature... not necessarily of a vintage, but of each railroads' standardized approach to the display boards. Class lights were also road-specific...
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Re: What is this?

Postby scaro » Wed Mar 04, 2015 3:43 pm

It could either be an F7 or a phase IV F3. As the drawing does not (yet) have dynamic brakes it is hard to say. F3s had two parallel roof grids for the dynamic brake, F7s had a single larger fan, in either case these were forward of the four main fans and behind the cab.

Phase IV F3s were sometimes called an 'F5', in an aborted naming by the EMD sales department which never became an 'official' EMD designation.
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Re: What is this?

Postby railtwister » Wed Mar 04, 2015 6:53 pm

I'm not sure that hand beaten accurately describes the panels, perhaps hand formed would be better, since the metal was quite thick, much more so than the body of an automobile. I believe the thickness was more like 3/16", and the pieces were cut, fitted and welded to get the shape, then the welds were hand faired using a disk grinder. The noses were all basically the same, but given the construction method, probably no two were exactly alike. In later years, plastic filler was used in the fairing process. Because of all the hand work, those beautiful and distinctive noses quickly became too expensive to produce, and we ended up with the flat panel styles we see today.

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