2 axle sliding wall van Hbis 294

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Rich B
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2 axle sliding wall van Hbis 294

Post by Rich B »

Image

PSK 3901 Hbis 294, DB Epoch IV/V

I forgot to take a picture before weathering :oops:

Rich B
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Re: 2 axle sliding wall van Hbis 294

Post by Rich B »

It's a crisp moulding with turned metal buffers, wheels running in what appear to be pressed bearings giving very free running. NEM pockets for couplings, it comes supplied with new style standard couplings. The lettering, though crisp, is not actually all legible, some being simply blocks. The paint finish is good. Detail-wise, I think there are a couple of end handrails missing, though these would be very fragile if fitted.

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CSD
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Re: 2 axle sliding wall van Hbis 294

Post by CSD »

I like the weathering. Looks good.
Mark
//S

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LVG1
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Re: 2 axle sliding wall van Hbis 294

Post by LVG1 »

Christtking wrote:I've consulted some photos of real life prototypes and they are some discrepancies about this model. The partitions (panels, sections) on the model seem to be 7 on the left sliding door (wall) to the center (vertical support beam for the sliding door latching mechanism) and 6 raised vertical dividers and the other half to the right another 7 panels, total of 14 per side. Unfortunately the model has only 12.
You're right about that. This model is kind of generic. It represents features of the types 294 and 295 on the one hand and features of the types 302, 303 and 304 on the other hand.
While all other features fit types 294 and 295, the number of segments is wrong—like you specified it.
Image
Types 302, 303 and 304 have 12 panels like the model, but differ by different ends, more narrow upper and lower edges of the sliding walls and by completely covered middle stanchions.
Image

At the first glance, the model looks like a representation of types 302, 303 and 304. Only a closer look shows the inconsistencies which hardly anybody knows. So for someone who's no rivet counter, this model is a good stand-in for these types.

On the other hand, like in America, also in Europe there are numerous variations of predominantly similar car types. Unfortunately, good literature about freight cars of any other railroad than DB is extremely hard to find in Germany.
The exact prototype of this model doesn't exist at DB but it's thoroughly possible that it exists at some other European railroad. I don't know.
PSK Modelbouw is a Dutch manufacturer. May be there's an exact prototype at some Dutch railroad. Possibly, rdikken knows more... :?: :?: :?:
Christtking wrote:If anyone has access to the German published book by GeraMond called "DB-Fahrzeuge" by author Michael Dostal, you can find the photos on pages 72 & 73 (or Hbikklls 295 category). 295 was the second generation of sliding/movable wall wagon based on type 294 (as the featured model).
What do you refer to by "second generation"?
In this context it sounds like type 295 was the second generation in contrast to type 295 (first generation). But that's wrong.
Types 294, 295, 302, 303 and 304—they all together are the second generation. The first generation is types 297, 298 and 299 with horizontal stiffeners. And third generation is types 305, 306 and 307 with roofs covering only about half of the cars' width and sliding doors with rounded upper ends covering a further quarter each. Types 310 and 311 could be counted as part of the third generation or as fourth generation because they have more narrow roofs and larger sliding walls.
May be, that's what you meant. But your formulation is kind of misleading and not definite.

Within the groups 294 / 295 and 302 / 303 / 304, there are no different generations, but only various batches with minor differences. I'm not sure if the differences are externally visible at all.


By the way:
The 14-panel cars look kind of strange to me. I'm more used to see the 12-panel ones.
May be, that's a question of amout. Only little more than 2,000 units with 14 panels were made. The 12-panel cars were made in larger amounts.
But may also be, that it's a question of time. I saw my first sliding wall cars in 1990. I can't remember to ever have seen a first-generation sliding wall car. Second-generation cars have been a rare sight in my area, too. And the 14-panel ones are the clearly older ones and were withdrawn from service step by step that time.
However, I wouldn't buy a 14-panel car, because I'm clearly more familiar with the 12-panel ones...
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Rich B
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Re: 2 axle sliding wall van Hbis 294

Post by Rich B »

This discussion has fuelled me to check up on the general dimensions. The prototype is approx. 13.1m over the body, and the model scales in at 12.8m- or a full scale foot too short.

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AstroGoat760
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Re: 2 axle sliding wall van Hbis 294

Post by AstroGoat760 »

Did that stand come with the car? I would imagine that the stand would be nice to put in one of those clear shelf cases, to display one's favourite rolling stock.
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Re: 2 axle sliding wall van Hbis 294

Post by LVG1 »

Rich B wrote:The prototype is approx. 13.1m over the body, and the model scales in at 12.8m- or a full scale foot too short.
Depends on how you measure...
Do you measure only the pure body or including the mechanisms on both ends or only the length of the chassis?

Referring to a diagram I've found, the body length is 12.98 m (42" 7') which is to scale 108.2 mm (4.259'). I'm not sure if it's the pure body or the chassis length or may be both.
But European railroaders usually refer to the length over buffers which is 14.22 m (46" 75/6') and to scale 118.5 mm (4.665').
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