Two Stall Enginehouse

Re: Two Stall Enginehouse

Postby Bernd » Wed Apr 17, 2019 8:40 pm

tomvanhoy wrote:Every time I look at this I think of building balsa and tissue airplanes back in the 50's and early 60's like my Dad did in the 30's and 40's! It makes it seem more do-able for me too in my retirement years. My monitor makes some of the boards seem to be stained purple, but I like the variation in color. I really enjoy seeing this come together.
Thanks!


Thanks Tom. My Dad also built airplanes back around that time too. He built sail planes from scratch. Maybe that's where I got the talent to do things like this. Also being retired helps, plus the wife being at work and not knowing what I'm doing. :shock:

Your monitor is correct. When I first starting staining the boards I used denatured alcohol and some old India Ink. That turned out o give a slight purple hue. I used some burnt umber acrylic paint thinned with alcohol also. Once that was dry I used green chalk powered and alcohol to give it the green color. I've just started to learn more about staining wood. It'll only get better.

Bernd
Image
User avatar
Bernd
 
Posts: 978
Images: 27
Joined: Wed Sep 02, 2015 8:43 am
Location: Rochester, New York

Re: Two Stall Enginehouse

Postby Bernd » Wed Apr 17, 2019 8:42 pm

ConducTTor wrote:You gotta use individual panes!!!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


Oh sure Alex, no pressure there, right? :lol: I'll give it a try. You do remember this is TT scale, right? :wink:

Bernd
Image
User avatar
Bernd
 
Posts: 978
Images: 27
Joined: Wed Sep 02, 2015 8:43 am
Location: Rochester, New York

Re: Two Stall Enginehouse

Postby ConducTTor » Thu Apr 18, 2019 12:55 am

Yeah but after you do it think about how accomplished you'll feel ;)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
What people think: "liberals/conservatives are ruining my country"
What the ruling class know: divide and conquer
User avatar
ConducTTor
Site Admin
 
Posts: 8608
Images: 13
Joined: Sat May 23, 2009 4:52 pm
Location: Atlanta GA USA

Re: Two Stall Enginehouse

Postby Bernd » Thu Apr 18, 2019 8:16 am

ConducTTor wrote:Yeah but after you do it think about how accomplished you'll feel ;)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


Of course you're right, but I might be ready for the funny farm after that. :crazy:

Bernd
Image
User avatar
Bernd
 
Posts: 978
Images: 27
Joined: Wed Sep 02, 2015 8:43 am
Location: Rochester, New York

Re: Two Stall Enginehouse

Postby ConducTTor » Thu Apr 18, 2019 9:33 am

Hahahaha


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
What people think: "liberals/conservatives are ruining my country"
What the ruling class know: divide and conquer
User avatar
ConducTTor
Site Admin
 
Posts: 8608
Images: 13
Joined: Sat May 23, 2009 4:52 pm
Location: Atlanta GA USA

Re: Two Stall Enginehouse

Postby AstroGoat760 » Thu Apr 18, 2019 9:54 am

Bernd wrote:Of course you're right, but I might be ready for the funny farm after that. :crazy:

Bernd

Come on over, we will put you to work!
Course Set, Speed - Maximum Warp, PUNCH IT!
User avatar
AstroGoat760
 
Posts: 3865
Images: 0
Joined: Fri Jul 24, 2009 8:07 pm
Location: Bemidji, Minnesota, USA

Re: Two Stall Enginehouse

Postby Bernd » Thu Apr 18, 2019 3:15 pm

AstroGoat760 wrote:
Bernd wrote:Of course you're right, but I might be ready for the funny farm after that. :crazy:

Bernd

Come on over, we will put you to work!


Ahhhhhh! I'll pass I'm allergic to work. Break out in a sweat. :problem:

Bernd
Image
User avatar
Bernd
 
Posts: 978
Images: 27
Joined: Wed Sep 02, 2015 8:43 am
Location: Rochester, New York

Re: Two Stall Enginehouse

Postby Bernd » Sat Apr 20, 2019 1:23 pm

Here’s a step by step build of the round TT scale window. I based the window size on the two vertical beams at the center of both the front and rear walls. I needed an outside diameter of .500”. The outer rim of the window was made .550” diameter. Gives a nice .025” lip on the round window. This is going to be an intensive picture post of 40 pictures. I took a picture of every important step in the procedure with a short explanation of each step. This second window didn’t turn out to be good enough to use. You’ll see why in some of the pictures. So let us begin.
The first thing I need was a piece of hardwood. I used a piece of rock maple in the lathe. It’s turned until the piece I need is round.
Image
Once round the piece is cut off.
Image
Next the round piece is transferred to the Sherline lathe for final sizing of the outside diameters, .550 & .500”
Image
Using the rear wall to check if the dia. is correct.
Image
Next, I drilled out the center to be able to get a boring bar in.
Image
Boring the inside out to make the inside diameter of the window.
Image
I didn’t pick any size for the I.D., just as long as it looked thin enough.
Image
A large piece is cut off and will be used later as a jig.
Image
I cut off the window to an arbitrary length. The allen wrench is used to catch the piece since it’s very fragile and I don’t want to get it caught in the chuck jaws. I have gotten my fingers whacked a few times on other projects. You learn not to do that after awhile. Pain is a good teacher.
Image
Success, now it just needs a bit of light sanding to get rid of the fuzz.
Image
And it fits.
Image
Next up is the making of the inner frame and spokes, plus the small center window. I used .020” dia. phosphor bronze wire. In order to get a nice and round piece I wrapped it around a mandrel, in this case a Xacto knife handle, with a small hole drilled in it to hold the wire while giving it a turn and half. You always need to go a bit further when trimming to a good circle.
Image
Like this.
Image
Image
Next, cut off the excess approximately in the center where they will be joined.
Image
Sorry for the out of focus picture. Didn’t set the lens to marco setting. This is what you should have after cutting the excess off.
Image
Next, push the cut ring into that spare part cut off earlier. This will be used as a jig to get the wire cut so the two ends meet for soldering.
Image
Notice the overlap, one end will be trimmed so the ends meet.
Image
I use a pair of sharp pointed tweezers at the point of where I want to cut the wire. I usually launch the wire several times into the ether before I get it cut to length.
Image
Another fuzzy picture. It shows how much needs to be trimmed.
Image
Trimming it to length. Please point it away from your eyes.
Image
And it’s a pretty good fit.
Image
Next up is the making of the small center window. It’s made from a piece of 1/8” dia. brass tubing with four holes drilled through at 90 degree angles to give four spokes.
Image
That’s one tiny drill, with a diameter of a little bigger than .020”.
Image
Next the outer ring has the end joints solder together. I used a bit of rosin flux and a solder paste.
Image
Image
The first cross member is cut to fit into the center of the ring.
Image
Image
Next the brass tube which has been cut a little over .500” long is placed in a hole drilled in a piece of ceiling tile. The longer spoke is place through one set of holes and the ring is spiked down so it won’t move during soldering.
Image
And here is where the problem began. I put a small drop of rosin flux and a couple of “to large of daps” solder paste.
Image
And the result is a lousy soldering job. The part is too small to hold and file away the solder. I was going to make another one but for the sake of my sanity I decided to keep going.
Image
Next the two remaining spokes are cut to length.
Image
The two spokes should have been a bit longer.
Image
And there you have it, one lousy soldering job. No excuse for that except I was in a hurry.
Image
I filled the center with solder to hold the spokes on the inside.
Image
Back to the lathe to trim the front excess off of the brass tube until the spokes are reached.
Image
The center is drilled out to the I.D. of the brass tube.
Image
The ring and spokes are cut off as close as possible on the back side without hitting the spokes or outer ring.
Image
There you have it, a piece of waste due to haste with a topping of too much solder.
Image
And the result is – it won’t fit. Back to doing another one.
Image
I didn’t stop and redo the part since it’ll show what can go wrong. I’m going to make a better jig to hold all the wire parts for soldering. I should have made a jig like I had tone for making a radio antenna in TT scale for a fellow modeler.
Image
That’s the route I’m taking to make another round window. I’m sure I’ll be able to use the jig in the future. Questions?
Bernd
Image
User avatar
Bernd
 
Posts: 978
Images: 27
Joined: Wed Sep 02, 2015 8:43 am
Location: Rochester, New York

Re: Two Stall Enginehouse

Postby TiTan downunder » Sun Apr 21, 2019 5:28 am

Bernd, that's an awful lot of work but, the finished, installed window does look fantastic.

Don't think I'll try anything like that on my little Unimat as I could just about guarantee I'll end up with nothing but mangled wire and broken drill bits.

Ian
TiTan downunder
 
Posts: 316
Images: 0
Joined: Tue Jun 22, 2010 11:14 pm
Location: NSW Australia

Re: Two Stall Enginehouse

Postby Bernd » Sun Apr 21, 2019 8:39 am

TiTan downunder wrote:Bernd, that's an awful lot of work but, the finished, installed window does look fantastic.

Don't think I'll try anything like that on my little Unimat as I could just about guarantee I'll end up with nothing but mangled wire and broken drill bits.

Ian


Thanks Ian. I see you have the lathe that used to be advertised in Model Railroader magazine back in the 50's and 60's. Back then I was going to get one. When I was ready to buy a small bench lathe I opted for the Sherline.

As far as the mangled wire and broken drill bits, the word is practice, practice and then some more practice. :wink:

Bernd
Image
User avatar
Bernd
 
Posts: 978
Images: 27
Joined: Wed Sep 02, 2015 8:43 am
Location: Rochester, New York

PreviousNext

Return to Builders' Corner

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

cron