TT Trackwork

Re: TT Trackwork

Postby krokodil » Wed Oct 22, 2014 3:03 pm

richardedmonds wrote:"krokodil"

That handlaid track photo is what I am getting at, that looks superb and completely non-toy like thats why I want to pursue the code 55 rail. The smaller the rails the better it looks to me even if I have to change wheels on everything


I would replace also all wheels for lower flanges, the problem is in my collection it is almost impossible. Many heritage but well working TT steamers, many of them stratchbuild , that is why I decided to stay on higher rails, and mask them as much as possible. A paint can help quite much.
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Re: TT Trackwork

Postby richardedmonds » Wed Oct 22, 2014 3:16 pm

Clover House standard length wood ties cost $1.08/ft.
Clover House Turnout length wood ties cost $2.17/ft.
Micro Engineering Code 55 Rail cost $0.98/ft

So, you can hand-lay TT track using store bought materials for between $2-$3 per foot.


Donnell[/quote]

Hi Donnell
that was interesting however the cost of parts is not the main problem it is getting them shipped to the UK that is big problem. Recently I got 150 yards of code 55 sent to the UK. Time I got it I had to pay a bill of £60.00 Tax plus and £8.00 handling charge yes another £8.00 for the post office to touch it on top of the $56.00 original shipping bill that equates to around $166.00 on top of the original price of $150.00.
So I do have to be realistic in what I can do
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Re: TT Trackwork

Postby richardedmonds » Wed Oct 22, 2014 3:26 pm

krokodil wrote:
richardedmonds wrote:"krokodil"

That handlaid track photo is what I am getting at, that looks superb and completely non-toy like thats why I want to pursue the code 55 rail. The smaller the rails the better it looks to me even if I have to change wheels on everything


I would replace also all wheels for lower flanges, the problem is in my collection it is almost impossible. Many heritage but well working TT steamers, many of them stratchbuild , that is why I decided to stay on higher rails, and mask them as much as possible. A paint can help quite much.


Well that makes perfect sense to me as well especially with a heritage collection like you have. I too have lots of older stuff but but I am not a collector although many would say I am. But having been playing around with Triang TT for years I want to expand my American ideas into a finer more prototypical scale. Unfortunately for me that means scale track or as close as I can get.
Don't get me wrong code 70 is sensible and reasonable alternative and looks very good, it's just I got the scale bug and I cant shake it off
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Re: TT Trackwork

Postby sd80mac » Wed Oct 22, 2014 3:28 pm

Honestly, I think the most economical and least time consuming track laying method is soldering rail to PC ties and/or spiking rail to wood ties using Proto87 Stores scale spikes. Yeah, we will probably have to live with the lack of track details, at least until someone come up with a viable injection molded solution.

In fact, using the PC tie method, one could theoretically offer prefab straights, and curves of various lengths and radii to form sectional "skeletal" track line.

Donnell
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Re: TT Trackwork

Postby richardedmonds » Wed Oct 22, 2014 3:40 pm

It will be very interesting to see how this works Bernd, I have to admire you though for really trying to make something that will probably work quite well. The problem I just thought about though was resin shrinkage if you was going to put groves in the ties for the rail.
From questions I asked here and looking on the net there does not seem much info on resin based ties or track and you could be on a winner with it if it works.
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Re: TT Trackwork

Postby richardedmonds » Wed Oct 22, 2014 3:43 pm

sd80mac wrote:Honestly, I think the most economical and least time consuming track laying method is soldering rail to PC ties and/or spiking rail to wood ties using Proto87 Stores scale spikes. Yeah, we will probably have to live with the lack of track details, at least until someone come up with a viable injection molded solution.

In fact, using the PC tie method, one could theoretically offer prefab straights, and curves of various lengths and radii to form sectional "skeletal" track line.

Donnell


That's great Donnell the whole point of doing this post was to get some idea of current thinking and personal and experienced preferences and I appreciate you nailing your colours to the mast
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Re: TT Trackwork

Postby j p » Wed Oct 22, 2014 4:17 pm

sd80mac wrote:Honestly, I think the most economical and least time consuming track laying method is soldering rail to PC ties and/or spiking rail to wood ties using Proto87 Stores scale spikes. Yeah, we will probably have to live with the lack of track details, at least until someone come up with a viable injection molded solution.

In fact, using the PC tie method, one could theoretically offer prefab straights, and curves of various lengths and radii to form sectional "skeletal" track line.

Donnell


If you can live with code70 rail then the least time consuming would be to buy it from Art&Detail. Wood ties + plastic tie plates and spikes (incl. missing spikes). It can be also the most economical, it depends on the price of your time.
It may work with Code 60 too, but I have not tried it.

Last page here:
http://www.ttnut.com/resources/a-d-us-product-flyer/4999

Image
Image
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Re: TT Trackwork

Postby krokodil » Wed Oct 22, 2014 5:49 pm

richardedmonds wrote:
krokodil wrote:
richardedmonds wrote:"krokodil"

That handlaid track photo is what I am getting at, that looks superb and completely non-toy like thats why I want to pursue the code 55 rail. The smaller the rails the better it looks to me even if I have to change wheels on everything


I would replace also all wheels for lower flanges, the problem is in my collection it is almost impossible. Many heritage but well working TT steamers, many of them stratchbuild , that is why I decided to stay on higher rails, and mask them as much as possible. A paint can help quite much.


Well that makes perfect sense to me as well especially with a heritage collection like you have. I too have lots of older stuff but but I am not a collector although many would say I am. But having been playing around with Triang TT for years I want to expand my American ideas into a finer more prototypical scale. Unfortunately for me that means scale track or as close as I can get.
Don't get me wrong code 70 is sensible and reasonable alternative and looks very good, it's just I got the scale bug and I cant shake it off


I am also not really a collector. Many years ago I sorted out my models, left from non standard scale just one example ((tt-Triang, Rokal initial Zeuke etc) just for a shelf, while the nicer models remain on the layout. A few if them got new wheel ( on diesels it was easy) but the steamers are still on their original axles. My scratchbuilt models had originally lower flanges, so they run also on new tracks. Would run also on Code55.
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Re: TT Trackwork

Postby sd80mac » Wed Oct 22, 2014 11:24 pm

Hey Bernd,

Going back to the laser-cut Taskboard idea, what if you were to carefully lay out 6 lengths of flex ties, side by side so that they share a common edge so the laser only has to make one pass? You could plot them on an 8" square of Taskboard or ply wood, and could also include tie spacers around the boarder (similar to Fast Tracks "TieClips") so that you can join them together and can create a 36" length of ties as shown in their video below starting at 3:36:



At this point, you have a few options. You could spike the rail directly to the tie strip. You could follow A&Ds approach and have tie plates printed that would insert into holes cut into the laser-cut ties. You could use etched tie plates (new idea alert!)with tabs that fold down into corresponding holes in the ties, very similar to A&Ds, but with a much thinner profile. Spikes could be raise "cosmetic bumps" next to the rail to keep it gauged...wait, wait, wait... (another new idea alert!) What if the PC "skeletal" track had etched tie plates soldered between the rail and ties, similar to what I did here:
Image Image Image Image

Then, you could fill in the gaps with Taskboard or plywood laser ties. The ties would have etch tie plates with tabs inserted in holes, as described earlier.

Donnell

PS - The rail shown in the pictures is code 55 on N-scale PC ties. The ties plate are Proto87 Stores HO-scale code 55 tie plates. All of this was experimental as I was planning to build Fast Track HO turnouts with P:87 tie plates soldered between the rail and PC ties.
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Re: TT Trackwork

Postby sd80mac » Thu Oct 23, 2014 12:45 am

j p wrote:If you can live with code70 rail then the least time consuming would be to buy it from Art&Detail. Wood ties + plastic tie plates and spikes (incl. missing spikes). It can be also the most economical, it depends on the price of your time.
It may work with Code 60 too, but I have not tried it.

Hello j p,

A&Ds track looks really good, but is it really economical, even for a small 4' X 8' layout? Let's say we had a loop of track on a 4' X 8' board with 20" radius curves and 48" of straight track in between. The total length of track is around 18.5' (5.6m). Using conventional materials at roughly $2/ft., total track cost would run just under $40. Taking an average of the cost of Atlas N-scale code 55 and HO-scale code 83 flex track, an equivalent 36" length of TT-scale flex would run about $6.50, or approximately $2.17/ft. Theoretically, this works out to about the same as handlaying.

I believe A&Ds track system is significantly higher at $18.11 per foot without rail. Just an 18.5' loop of A&D track without rail would run $334.95. That is just not economically feasible for most modelers.

Donnell
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