TT Free-mo

Re: TT Free-mo

Postby gerhard_k » Fri Nov 07, 2014 2:03 pm

railtwister wrote:When I was talking about legs, I was referring to single 2x2's, rather than leg pairs. My most recent modules have seen the 2x2 legs mounted in each corner, and secured with a set screw (actually a 1/4-20 x 2" long eyebolt) & tee nut mounted in the 45 degree corner brace. Very simple, very light, and very easy to store/transport/set-up. I can provide some more details of the legs if you want.

Bill in FtL

Would really like to see a diagram of how you implement this - might help others besides me, and would certainly remove one excuse for not starting on a couple of modules of my own :whistle:
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Re: TT Free-mo

Postby railtwister » Fri Nov 07, 2014 10:42 pm

gerhard_k wrote:Would really like to see a diagram of how you implement this - might help others besides me, and would certainly remove one excuse for not starting on a couple of modules of my own :whistle:


Bernard,

I just posted 4photos showing the simple yet rigid module legs in this group's Gallery. Right now, they show up at the top of the Gallery page, but I'm not sure how to make them easily accessible in the future, once a lot more photos get posted to the Gallery (I was lucky just to be able to figure out how to post them here from my iPad, to say nothing of organizing them so they're easy to find). Putting them in a separate Album or Folder would be good, but I can't figure how to do this (perhaps Alex can help here).

I hope these photos help you visualize how the legs work. We've used this design for at least 18 modules in both On30 and O 3-rail modules during the last 6 months, and they have proven to be quite rigid and easy to assemble/disassemble. Let me know if you have any questions...

Bill in FtL
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Re: TT Free-mo

Postby railtwister » Sat Nov 08, 2014 9:45 am

Bernd wrote:Hey Bill,

Nice clean job on those legs and very simple. Looks like one needs a table saw to do that.

Bernd


Hi Bernd,

Thanks, for once, I've finally come up with an idea that actually works! The thing that makes these legs so solid is the way the set screw/eyebolt presses the two sides of the leg into the corner of the module frame, essentially creating a tapered fit. Another advantage of this design is that properly done, the legs are interchangeable, unlike the paired legs in pockets which usually will only fit properly in "their" end of the module, requiring you to mark which leg goes where. You could also use a round wooden closet rod and eliminate the notch (but you would still need the head of the roofing nail to prevent the set screw from damaging the wooden leg), thus eliminating the need for a table saw, but indexing the round leg to keep the nail in the correct position to meet the set screw would require a certain amount of care and attention during set up. Not having the notch would also eliminate the "step" that the module rests upon, which I feel is an important feature that preserves the integrity of the module frame and it's plywood deck. I have used 1/4" plywood on all my modules built since 1985, except for some O scale trolley modules I built according to East Penn specs, and have never had a problem where I would have been better off using thicker plywood. Recently, I built some shelf sections for an O guage 3-rail test loop, and I used some 3/4" plywood I had on hand, rather than spending money on a sheet in a thinner size, and even though the sections are small and narrow, that 3/4" plywood is really heavy! Hopefully, my test loop won't need to be moved often, as would be the case with modules.

Actually, you could also make the notch using a Bandsaw or a table mounted Router, maybe even a small handheld Router if you could rig the proper fixture, but I think table saws are more commonly found in home workshops. If you have no power tools, I think it would be possible to make the notch with a good quality stiff-back hand saw and sharp wood chisel, but you would need some sort of vise to hold the leg securely while you're working. Power tools make the job faster, easier, and more accurately repeatable.

Regards,

Bill in FtL
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Re: TT Free-mo

Postby gerhard_k » Sat Nov 08, 2014 6:40 pm

Bill - those legs are very simple and functional, and I think could be a good RP for our module specs. I will certainly use this design. Thanks!

For those who are worried about needing precision and power tools, the only features that are critical are
1) the shoulder (on the leg) that seats against the bottom of the 45° corner brace to establish the height, which needs to be at 90° to the length (and the exact location lengthwise can be compensated by the adjustable foot nuts),
2) the hole for the wing screw, which needs to be square through the corner brace, and
3) the head of the roofing nail (or equivalent), the hole for which wants to be at the same 45° angle as the corner brace.
The 45° chunk of wood which is to be removed does not require any precision, as long as enough is taken off to fit into the pocket.

I think with a little care, anyone could make these legs with a handsaw and and a hand drill, and maybe a file.

Ok, one more excuse gone away... :whistle:
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Re: TT Free-mo

Postby Richard-B » Sun Nov 09, 2014 3:27 pm

railtwister wrote:<snip> I just posted 4 photos showing the simple yet rigid module legs in this group's Gallery.
First impression: beautiful woodworking... and a very clean solution.

2nd impression: This section is at least TWICE as heavy as the ones used for 10 years on the Yosemite Short Line (YSL - On30) sectional layout... I'm not convinced that such heavy construction is really needed... but granted; It is bulletproof!

The YSL sections are framed in door-skin ply... and decked with 2in blue foam tops, set into the sides with construction adhesive. An entire un-sceniced 24" by 48" section can be lifted easily on two fingers.

Legs are 2x2s... set into square half-pockets, and have removable sway braces. More importantly, they have adjustable-height foot hardware, since we've yet to find a level convention center floor!

Construction photos in the PDF:
About the YSL layout.pdf
YSL Info and Construction
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Richard Brennan - http://www.tt-west.com
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