TT Car Weight "Standards"

Re: TT Car Weight "Standards"

Postby ConducTTor » Wed Nov 04, 2015 1:31 pm

WillYart wrote:Like the operational results.


Can you expound on that? For me the main advantage (I haven't done a test) to adding weight is less rocking of the cars as they roll along.
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Re: TT Car Weight "Standards"

Postby WillYart » Thu Nov 05, 2015 12:32 am

Huh. Maybe I'm just saying that because 20 years ago I ran my trains way too fast (I was just a kid) and my track work left something to be desired. My heavier cars jumped the tracks less often. I think heavier cars are more tolerant of adverse conditions. Also I have a feeling they push the loco past bad spots on switches and stuff if the tracks are oxidized or corroded.

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Re: TT Car Weight "Standards"

Postby gerhard_k » Tue Nov 24, 2015 11:32 pm

ConducTTor wrote:
WillYart wrote:Like the operational results.


Can you expound on that? For me the main advantage (I haven't done a test) to adding weight is less rocking of the cars as they roll along.

If you actually *operate* your trains, rather than just run them around in circles :whistle: higher weight has several advantages:

1) Coupling the cars, the force needed to engage the couplers will tend to push the cars down the track, heavier cars will be smoother to couple.
2) Manually un-coupling the cars, with some rod or pick (assuming Kadee couplers), heavier cars are less likely to be derailed by the force exerted on the coupler - this is really obvious if you ever operate US-style on an N-gauge layout, it's just too often that I de-rail a freight car there.
3) as Alex said, heavier cars are less likely to bobble down the track - smoother rolling looks better.
4) if you run very long trains, having underweight cars up front near the locomotive may cause "string-lining", that is, on long sharp curves, the train may fall over towards the inside of the curve. This can also be made worse if the engine is not running smoothly, as jerky traction will pull trains over.
4a) this is also a good argument against using too much (or any?) super-elevation on the track - trains leaning into curves look sexy, but not if they topple over to the inside of the curve :roll:

As discussed previously in this thread, I plan to use the NMRA recommendations for consistency, even though, compared to the other scales, they may seem somewhat heavy for TT.
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Re: TT Car Weight "Standards"

Postby WillYart » Fri Nov 30, 2018 11:12 pm

Since weights are placed below the vertical center of a car, I'd assume they lower the center of gravity which seems like a good thing in the case of superelevation
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