This guy is so cool.

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Re: This guy is so cool.

Postby LVG1 » Sun May 10, 2015 8:48 am

Bernd wrote:Say the word and I'm gone.

I've not received the impression that Alex was keen on kicking somebody out.
I'ld rather think, it's about how to treat each other...
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Re: This guy is so cool.

Postby LVG1 » Sun May 10, 2015 9:34 am

By the way:

Bernd wrote:Ask the people in England that died one winter because they froze to death since there wasn't any wind to generate power.

Can you give a reference to this information's source?

Remote areas where people don't have a chance to find a warm place without their own source of energy are rather rare in England...

Bernd wrote:That wasn't a very publicized news event since it made the green energy folks look bad.

I don't know what it's like in America. But in Germany, there's a heated debate about renewable energies. So, media are keen on pros and cons of both sides because both raise their sales.
So, I'm a little bit irritated to not have heard about that...
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Re: This guy is so cool.

Postby ConducTTor » Sun May 10, 2015 12:46 pm

Bernd wrote:I have nothing further to say on this subject. I have my opinions and others have there's. Unfortunately Alex you took it personal.

Say the word and I'm gone.

The end.

Bernd


There's no need for that. I have no problem with your opinion.

I have a problem being called a "weenie" and whatever else was in your comments. I've never called you anything derogatory. A simple "my bad" would suffice.
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Re: This guy is so cool.

Postby Tom Dempsey » Sun May 10, 2015 2:41 pm

Back on subject, I think he's cool too, Alex. Mostly because whether he's right or wrong, he's forward looking, willing to take a risk, and generous with sharing the rewards of his success. All things that made America and Americans successful in the past and traits that are increasingly rare in this country now.
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Re: This guy is so cool.

Postby LVG1 » Sun May 10, 2015 4:16 pm

Bernd wrote:My statement was "All because the green weenies wanted to get rid of coal fired power plants." I did not mention your name.

You addressed all people looking for an environmentally friendly way to go.
And this includes also me.

Bernd wrote:Most Europeans can't afford a 2800 square foot house sitting on 6 acres of land. Or the price of gas to go 20 to 30 miles to work and back in one day. It's hard for any European to comprehend going 300 miles and still be in the same state.

Obviously, you've been fallen for American stereotypes about Europe.
2800 square foot are 260 square meters. I thoroughly know some people having houses of this size.
And going 20 to 30 miles to work and back every day is absolutely normal here.
And why shouldn't I be able to comprehend going 300 miles and still be in the same state? I've often gone 500 miles and still was in Germany...

Bernd wrote:Another thing to ask yourself is why did so many Europeans and others emigrate to the US in the last 100 years? Must be something over hear that everybody liked.

May be, stereotypes???

Is it possible that you have missed the fact that during the recent decades more people per year migrated to Europe than to North America (in spite of less land mass)?

Bernd wrote:A lot of this green energy craze is driven by politics. Al Gores global warming, East Anglia's inverted hockey stick showing global warming. The poor Polar Bears drowning because ice floes are shrinking. When in actuality the polar ice cap is growing.

No, not at all.
It was scientists who broached the issue of global warming. (And I've never heard of scientists outside America who don't believe in global warming...)
Politicians usually try to sweep such things under the carpet (as far as I know, in America even more than in Europe). They are steered by lobbyists financed by large trusts. And they want to keep things unchanged because they otherwise would earn less money.

Tom Dempsey wrote:Mostly because whether he's right or wrong, he's forward looking, willing to take a risk, ...

I undersign...
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Re: This guy is so cool.

Postby ConducTTor » Sun May 10, 2015 4:41 pm

Ok, I've had enough. I thought we could talk about cutting edge technology and innovation but that went to hell. Berndt is gone. His comments are no longer to be discussed.

For everyone else, whatever your point of view is, please present it with a modicum of respect towards others.
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Re: This guy is so cool.

Postby LVG1 » Tue May 12, 2015 3:10 pm

Okay!
Back to topic!

I confess, I don't like the style of presentation shown in the video.
However, Tesla Energy is working on a very important topic.
Like I already said, renewable energies by now cover a quarter of the entire electricity production in Germany. So, a point has been reached where the grid unconditionally needs solutions for energy storage to become able to handle further growth of renewable energy production. Yet, an "ultimate" solution has not been found.

There are pump storage stations in Germany. But their capacity does by far not cover the needs of renewable energies.
Currently, there are two other trends, here:
  • A growing number of hog- and cattle-farms and a growing number of sewage plants install facilities to collect biogas (which is their omnipresent waste-product). And the associated biogas power plants (yes, they make electricity out of sh*t) try to establish themselves as back-up, only working when wind is weak and sun doesn't shine, respectively.
    But the amount of available energy is limited by the amount of sh*t you produce. So I think, it's only useful as one of various back-up power sources.
    Biogas has relatively similar combustion properties like petroleum gas. But it has two major advantages. You don't need an additive to make it perceptible by odor. And it decomposes in contact with air which makes it clearly less hazardous.
    Additionally, biogas is a clearly more compact energy carrier than batteries. (And quick fuelling doesn't reduce the lifespan of its tank...) So, I'ld rather like to see it as fuel for cars. But yet, it's not offered for this purpose, as far as I know.
  • Another trend is fuel-cell based energy storage. Surplus energy from wind turbines is used to split water into hydrogen (which is then stored) and oxygen. And when the grid needs more energy than the wind turbines produce, the fuel cells make electricity (and water vapor) out of the stored hydrogen and the oxigen in the air.
    At the first glance, it sounds great. But electrically producing hydrogen out of water has a waste-product: heavy water. In marginal amounts, heavy water is a natural component of our environment. But nobody knows what would happen if its amount noticably raises...
So, further alternatives are intensely discussed—also batteries.
Unfortunately, batteries are big, they're heavy, they're short-lived and they're toxic. For large amounts of energy, their life-cycle costs are too high—not least because of their ecologically problematic disposal.

For small amounts of energy, however, batteries are a great solution. For saving fuel by buffering the engine's energy in cars and locomotives and so on, and for buffering the energy of solar cells on private homes, they're next to perfect. Entirely electric cars are limited in their operating distance because of batteries' low capacity on given space and weight.
Compared with conventional batteries, lithium-ion batteries (like those of Tesla Energy) are a giant improvement because they save lots of space and don't emit acid vapor. They're not new; they've been used for years in cell phones.
In Germany, feeding privately produced energy into the grid is far too much subsidized. It unnecessarily strains the grid (because unnecessarily much energy has to be transported) and takes private energy producers out of their responsibility. Lots of solar cells are sold in Germany. But hardly anybody even considers to store their self-produced surplus energy for sunless times. Who shall pay for the energy storage facilities within the grid? Finally, it'll be left for the tax payer.

But for industrial size energy storage, even those lithium-ion batteries are too inefficient.
I've recently heard that a new generation of batteries has been developed. I've forgotten their name. As far as I know, they are not yet fit for mass-production. They are more efficient than lithium-ion batteries. But I don't know if they'll be efficient enough for industrial size energy storage.
But even if not, it's good to know that progress is going on...

Bernd wrote:Solar power and wind power is a wet dream.

If the trend of the recent years concerning growth of renewable-energy production in Germany continued,
Germany's electricity would become 100 % renewable within the next 25 years!!! :!:
So, renewable energy is far more than just a "wet dream". It's a dream being coming true! :dance: :clap: :grin:

Unfortunately, German government recently let go the anchor... :evil:
The large energy trusts fear the growing rivalry with the popular and unbeatably cheap renewable energies not being under their control. So, they sent their lobbyists and abused their (still too slowly shrinking) influence to make our government clearly raise the hurdle for investments into renewable energies. :evil: :evil: :evil:

For me, that's tragical twice.
I'm hoping that my employer gives me a full-time job as soon as I've finished my studies. But he needs further growth in the renewable-energy market to justify my job.
Another point is: every day which our government prefers antiquated technology over renewable energies, Vattenfall's lignite excavators devour more and more of my home region.
Just thinking of that makes my heart bleed... :cry:


What about North America?
What is it like there?
What's the status of renewable energies?
Is there anybody having information they can share here?
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Re: This guy is so cool.

Postby j p » Tue May 12, 2015 3:31 pm

I got a good 2 months' introduction to the power business in 2000 - it was not in Europe, it was in Japan.
The host power company had all kinds of power plants: coal, oil, gas, nuclear, water, huge pumped storage in the mountains, solar, wind, and geothermal. I had a chance to visit all types. They had even their own experimental fuel-cell plant. (But they did not have any electric eel plant.) They also realized that the best is the energy saved. They developed some kind of cold-accumulator for air conditioning for large office and industrial buildings. It made ice by night and used that ice for cooling down the air in the afternoon. And they subsidized it. That way they could reduce the peak load (=less power plants and less pollutions)
Their conclusion about the best energy source was very wise - and correct imho:
None of the power sources is ideal. A combination of many of them is needed for a stable and efficient power system.

Wind power share in Denmark is quite high - but that is possible only when working together with Norwegian pumped storage water power plants. Using renewable fuels for power generation may be also a good idea. Just be careful not to convert too many power plants to it. When I see that they import the wood chips for it from Africa, it does not seem to be so environmentally friendly anymore.

Anyway, I think that the best for this topic would be to delete it.
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Re: This guy is so cool.

Postby LVG1 » Tue May 12, 2015 3:42 pm

j p wrote:Their conclusion about the best energy source was very wise - and correct imho:
None of the power sources is ideal. A combination of many of them is needed for a stable and efficient power system.

That's true.
Many different sources of energy are needed.

...but not all...
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Re: This guy is so cool.

Postby Tom Dempsey » Tue May 12, 2015 5:54 pm

Well, I'm told I've been a major source of biogas for years and yet I'm still waiting for someone to bid on the harvesting rights.
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