Steam Locomotive Scratch Building

Steam Locomotive Scratch Building

Postby TTTerrific » Tue Feb 09, 2016 12:35 pm

I am starting to get very serious about attempting to build a TT scale steamer. I don't care if I build it out of wood, plastic or brass, though I'll give brass the first shot. I have a supply of TT scale air pumps, pop-valves, etc., but I need to procure some items that might be getting scarce such as handrail support posts, very small track spikes (for smoke-box door dogs), small machine screws, and driver wheels,etc.. Maybe a number of you (Hi, Al) might know of sources for some of these and other needed items. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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Re: Steam Locomotive Scratch Building

Postby areibel » Tue Feb 09, 2016 2:52 pm

LOL!
Well for the small bolts and screws I get them from Microfasteners- https://www.microfasteners.com/
For the handrail supports and air tank mount straps it looks like HP mostly just used small brass cotter pins, I'd have to measure an original to get a size but if that wouldn't work I'd get some .008 or .010 wire from Clover House and give it a go bending up my own?

Spikes, probably the smallest ones I know of would be from Micro Engineering, or another piece of rod with the end flattened slightly might do in a pinch?

There was an excellent article on scratchbuilding a boiler out of styrene in Model Railroad Hobbyist by Ken Rickman, I can't remember when (it was probably two or three years ago) but it's in one of the back issues on their site. He used plastic pipe as a form, wrapped styrene sheet around it and boiled it in a microwave to make it hold shape, then added details. Archer rivets would work for the ash pan and smoke box, and if you have the brass bits already the rest shouldn't be terrible. And Ken actually lists a couple different Southeastern prototype boilers and cabs on Shapeways. They're HO, but I'd bet he would dial them down to TT if anyone was interested. http://www.shapeways.com/shops/dkrickman I don't know how they'd match up to the loco you'd like to build but they may help.

For the chassis I've always wanted to try using some of the Romford drivers, they make several different sizes that might work and I think they're self quartering (Richard Edmonds might be able to shed more light here!). Worsley Works offered a couple fold up chassis etches and I think they include the rods as well. You could use brass "top hat" bearings soldered in for the axles or get really fancy and go with some small roller bearings from VXB. If you look at Ken Rickman's Shapeways shop his TT diesel power truck has a listing of some interesting parts from VXB and Nigel Lawton that might be very helpful chassis wise- drive and worm gears, motors, etc..

My other thoughts would be using an HP chassis but using a cast resin set of cylinders to help avoid the shorting out problems seem to suffer from.. I have some, I just haven't tried them yet so if you're interested let me know and you could be the guinea pig!

And even an appropriate Tillig or Rocco chassis might work. One thing I haven't tried is Chris Happe's method of turning down the flanges with a file, if you could knock down the bigger flanges that would make the chassis easy. Some HO chassis might work as well, like the Roundhouse HOn3 2-8-0 but those aren't always easy to find. Others, like Bachmann make some that are close in size but they're usually pretty wide, like Code 100. Another experiment would be to try and narrow something like that, if ou could pop the driver apart, file the face of the tire down and the back of the center to narrow it a bit it might work? (or it might wind up in the junk box under my bench, hidden, so I don't have to explain to my wife how I bought a $100 engine, tore it apart and tried to destroy parts of it :whistle: )
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Re: Steam Locomotive Scratch Building

Postby Bernd » Tue Feb 09, 2016 3:36 pm

I started a thread ( http://www.ttnut.com/semi-scratchbuild-2-6-0-t2686.html ) for a possible 2-6-0 semi scratch build engine. I'm working on the drivers right now to narrow them to TT scale. Also you may want to try phosphor bronze size .008" wire to make spikes. The silver looking one is a standard pin with the head cut off.

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Re: Steam Locomotive Scratch Building

Postby richardedmonds » Tue Feb 09, 2016 5:48 pm

Richard Edmonds might be able to shed more light here!). Worsley Works offered a couple fold up chassis etches and I think they include the rods as well. You could use brass "top hat" bearings soldered in for the axle

The Worsley chassis were just a generic design similar to the HP chassis that I asked Allen to do for me a long time ago. They are not specific for anything and are really an aid as opposed to a kit.
Outside of the 3mm Society ( which is the best place for loco parts ) I would look at 3smr which is here in the UK.
The 3mm society is the best place for suitable wheels however due to tax purposes and VAT rules you can only purchase parts from them if you are a full subscribing member, and this they enforce rigidly.
The older Romford wheels now available from Markits are probably HO/00 wheels and look a bit too hefty for TT but do work.
It is really hard to source good wheels for TT 1:120 outside of Europe and the probable best source would be Tillig wheels but I am told these are quite hard to obtain, but I am not sure of this. My preferences are the old HP wheels which are pretty good considering their age for most scratchbuilding.
I hope this helps.
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Re: Steam Locomotive Scratch Building

Postby TiTan downunder » Wed Feb 10, 2016 12:49 am

>> small machine screws, and driver wheels,etc.. Maybe a number of you (Hi, Al) might know of sources for some of these and other needed items. Any help would be greatly appreciated. <<

small, and I mean small, screws, 0.5mm, 1.0mm, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6 as standard sizes used in the optical industry.

The nose pads on your metal framed spectacles are held on with the 0.5 or 1.0mm screws, usually only 3 or 4mm long. The BIGGER 1.2 to 1.6mm are what hold the frames together, either holding the lenses in the frames or the temples ( sides ) on the front. These can be from 3mm up to 10mm long. IF you don't make a nuisance of yourself, you might find your "friendly" optician will give you a few for the odd dollar or two. They will either be amused or interested when you explain what you want them for.
As an aside to this, the screws that hold the hinge cover plate on, on older Safilo brand frames, are a perfect fit for the valve gear screws on the Kemtron, etc 0-4-0 dockside tank loco.

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Re: Steam Locomotive Scratch Building

Postby gerhard_k » Mon Feb 15, 2016 7:48 pm

TiTan downunder wrote:small, and I mean small, screws, 0.5mm, 1.0mm, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6 as standard sizes used in the optical industry.

As an aside to this, the screws that hold the hinge cover plate on, on older Safilo brand frames, are a perfect fit for the valve gear screws on the Kemtron, etc 0-4-0 dockside tank loco.

Ian

I don't actually know this specifically, but I would be surprised if the old Kemtron kits used metric fasteners. Back then we were pretty self-sufficient in our US fastener systems. :whistle:

In fact, I would advise you to be careful - many small US threads may appear quite similar to metric and may seem to fit the hole, until you're 6-8 turns in, when things bind up and you find you have succeeded in buggering the threads... :wall:
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Re: Steam Locomotive Scratch Building

Postby Bernd » Mon Feb 15, 2016 10:40 pm

gerhard_k wrote:In fact, I would advise you to be careful - many small US threads may appear quite similar to metric and may seem to fit the hole, until you're 6-8 turns in, when things bind up and you find you have succeeded in buggering the threads... :wall:


Easy fix. Drill out the threads. Solder in a plug and re-tap with 0-80 or 00-90 thread.

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Re: Steam Locomotive Scratch Building

Postby richardedmonds » Tue Feb 16, 2016 2:38 pm

Bernd wrote:
gerhard_k wrote:In fact, I would advise you to be careful - many small US threads may appear quite similar to metric and may seem to fit the hole, until you're 6-8 turns in, when things bind up and you find you have succeeded in buggering the threads... :wall:


Easy fix. Drill out the threads. Solder in a plug and re-tap with 0-80 or 00-90 thread.

Bernd


Quite right Bernd, ever since European harmonisation small BA screws taps and dies are increasingly hard to obtain here in the UK. Now I tend to use American screws on everything including British outline stuff. They are reasonably priced and easy to obtain in good quantities. They also tend to arrive in about a week so no reason to use anything else really
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Re: Steam Locomotive Scratch Building

Postby Bernd » Tue Feb 16, 2016 3:13 pm

Learned that little trick from work. I drilled holes in the wrong spot occasionally. :o :shock: :( But a plug and some Loctite solved the problem.

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