Roller Gauges

Re: Roller Gauges

Postby ConducTTor » Sun Jan 31, 2016 2:28 pm

Isn't a set of trucks with wheels the perfect gauge? :wink:
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Re: Roller Gauges

Postby ctxmf74 » Sun Jan 31, 2016 4:38 pm

"Isn't a set of trucks with wheels the perfect gauge?"

If one has all the types of trucks they want to run handy they can be great for gauging to help decide how to accommodate them all. ........DaveB
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Re: Roller Gauges

Postby railtwister » Sun Jan 31, 2016 7:30 pm

I think for laying track, the first gauge (with the handle) will be better, because it holds the rail in its groove, preventing it from slipping into a wider gauge during the spiking process. I don't think the handle is such a great idea, it makes the gauge look too much like a hammer. Somewhere, I have some HO roller gauges made by the late Russ Simpson, which were turned from brass (without the handle) and they worked quite well.

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Re: Roller Gauges

Postby Bernd » Sun Jan 31, 2016 8:39 pm

The question shouldn't be which gauge is better, but should ask the question, "Is the roller gauge used only on turnouts to set the frog to wing rail and stock rail to guard rail to the proper distance?"

The roller gauge would be a poor choice of gauge to use on curved track. A three point gauge is more useful for that. As far as straight track is concerned the straight track jig I've made takes care of any need for a gauge at all.

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Re: Roller Gauges

Postby Tom Dempsey » Sun Jan 31, 2016 8:43 pm

Alex, using a wheel set as a gauge isn't a good idea, the allowable tolerances are too wide. That's why you use a gauge that accommodates for minimum and maximum specifications.

Bernd, the roller gauges are great for making curves, if you are using modern fine scale wheels, you don't need the widening in the curves unless you are operating long fixed wheelbase motive power.
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Re: Roller Gauges

Postby Bernd » Sun Jan 31, 2016 10:03 pm

Tom Dempsey wrote:Bernd, the roller gauges are great for making curves, if you are using modern fine scale wheels, you don't need the widening in the curves unless you are operating long fixed wheelbase motive power.


My mind doesn't seem to want to wrap around that they would work on cured track. It would seem to me with the rail head being in the groove of the roller gauge that it would bind. Unless of course you are only using one with a flange on it like I made. Ok I'm satisfied with the answer.

Now, what kind of roller gauge do you have in mind?

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Re: Roller Gauges

Postby ctxmf74 » Sun Jan 31, 2016 10:26 pm

"The question shouldn't be which gauge is better, but should ask the question, "Is the roller gauge used only on turnouts to set the frog to wing rail and stock rail to guard rail to the proper distance?" "

Roller gauges and others like three point gauges are for holding the track in gauge while it's spiked or soldered ( that's why I prefer a flat top gauge so extra weight can be set on top) The correct gauge for setting and checking turnout parts is a standards gauge like the TT gauge made by Coastal (or NMRA for HO scale for example) The only problem with using these standards gauges for TT is that cars like Gold Coast do not have standard wheel sets so that's where using a truck to adjust the settings comes in.....DaveB
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Re: Roller Gauges

Postby TinGoat » Mon Feb 01, 2016 10:37 am

For roller gauges you need a set of maybe 3 or 4 so that you can set the rail gauge over a length of track.

I like the ones from Railway Engineering but they don't have 12mm.

Being made of Lucite Plastic means no accidental short circuits if you find yourself doing a check/repair when the rails are live.

Railway Engineering Track Gauges
http://www.railwayeng.com/gauges.htm

For many years it was believed that track needed to be wider in the curves. This was never true. An accurate gauge that lays the rails with the correct spacing, doesn't need to widen in the curves.There is already plenty of room for play.
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Re: Roller Gauges

Postby ctxmf74 » Mon Feb 01, 2016 2:18 pm

"they don't have 12mm."

If you want plastic gauges just get some 1/4 inch plexiglas and cut it into rectangles with the long side a bit wider than TT track ,then use a hand saw that matches your rail width and make two kerfs at the correct gauge spacing. These rectangular versions can be made in quantity quite cheaply and have flat tops so they can be weighted when laying out curves. They slide along the rails instead of rolling but they work fine ......DaveB
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Re: Roller Gauges

Postby dwyaneward » Mon Feb 01, 2016 11:46 pm

[quote="ctxmf74"]"they don't have 12mm."

If you want plastic gauges just get some 1/4 inch plexiglas and cut it into rectangles with the long side a bit wider than TT track ,then use a hand saw that matches your rail width and make two kerfs at the correct gauge spacing. These rectangular versions can be made in quantity quite cheaply and have flat tops so they can be weighted when laying out curves. They slide along the rails instead of rolling but they work fine ......DaveB[/quote

Something like these, I made awhile back when I asked about track gauges. Laser cut from 1/8" acrylic

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