Rapid Prototyping for Lost Wax Casting

Rapid Prototyping for Lost Wax Casting

Postby TinGoat » Wed Jul 13, 2011 11:39 am

Hi Gang,

I just picked this up from the Model Rail Radio mailing list.

Check out Pacific Locomotive Works...

This topic (3D printing) comes up now and again, but this is the first. I'd read of the print medium being wax.

Subject: RE: [NMRAAP] 3D Lithography - building plastic parts by computer

There were two different clinics on "rapid prototyping" at the Convention (I was unable to attend either). One was by Bill Brisko of Pacific Locomotive Works (http://www.pacificlocomotive.com/)...Bill talks about the process on his website. Basically, the part is drawn in Solidworks (a 3D drafting program as Scott mentions) and the "printer" makes a 3D wax master (other printers will make resin masters or parts). From that, Bill has lost-wax castings made.

We are having a discussion on 3-D stereolithography on the Yahoo Egroup Traintools. I saw a clinic on this at the NMRA national convention and was blown away by what you can do with it.

>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/traintools/

A fellow sent in a 3-D cad drawing of a locomotive driver...and it was printed in metal and sent to him the next day. Amazing! It would have taken me 30 hours to manufacture it.

The group is about 10 years old and has 1,700 members. All they do is talk about model train tools.
Happy Railroadin'
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Re: Rapid Prototyping for Lost Wax Casting

Postby scaro » Wed Jul 13, 2011 12:16 pm

Now that is really interesting.
scaro
 

Re: Rapid Prototyping for Lost Wax Casting

Postby TinGoat » Thu Jul 14, 2011 8:53 am

Unfortunately, it is also a little on the expensive side...

Yes, this process has been around for a while now. The main uses I have seen it in is the jewelry industry and other places where a variety of small castings are required. most machines can produce a 0.0005" fidelity. To put that in perspective that is less that 1/16" in HO scale! So great we can "print" highly accurate wax masters, but it comes at a cost. Most places charge based on 3 factors: time they have to invest in working on your digital artwork preparing for their machines, time it takes the machine to run, and amount of material used. To give a bench mark for the last 2. On the modern 4-4-0 boiler I have been working on I was quoted $175-$300. The machines are not cheap either starting at over $20,000 keeps most amateurs from purchasing these.

What would be really awesome to see with this technology is users creating a free 3-D library of the parts that they create so that others can use them, modify them as necessary, send them off to a printer & caster and have all the parts imaginable available.
Happy Railroadin'
The Tin Goat
Ron Wm. Hurlbut
Overlooking Fairbank on the Toronto Belt Line
Ontario, Dominion of Canada
====
The Ontario Narrow Gauge Show:
http://www.narrowgaugeontario.com
====
Humber Valley & Simcoe Railway Blog:
http://humbervalleysimcoerailway.blogspot.com/
====
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Re: Rapid Prototyping for Lost Wax Casting

Postby ConducTTor » Thu Jul 14, 2011 11:48 am

TinGoat wrote:Unfortunately, it is also a little on the expensive side...


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