New Member

Re: New Member

Postby milwrd1 » Wed Mar 05, 2014 12:08 pm

I believe readily available flex track with a code 70 or 60 rail would be a very desirable item.
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Re: New Member

Postby areibel » Wed Mar 05, 2014 12:13 pm

Track would be nice but that is a big project to tackle unless you can cut a 3'flextrack base mold- if you can you would be everyone in TT's best friend!
I go with freight cars, myself. For modelling anything between the transition era and the piggyback/container trains we need boxcars! Other than the Gold Coast cars there isn't a good 40 foot car available, like a PS-1. And 50 footers are really bleak, there are some ancient kits from HP and the ones Rob is offering (Railbox and waffle sides), but again the standard run of the mill boxcars that were common from 1960-1980 aren't available.
There are several two bay hoppers available, but only one three bay. Gondolas aren't too bad, between Rob and ConducTTor's versions, flats and tanks are getting better but we could use almost anything!
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Re: New Member

Postby j p » Wed Mar 05, 2014 12:38 pm

ConducTTor wrote:Bernd, there is a big push right now for rail. The only thing we have available to us is Tillig from Europe and they're a not really prototypical - it's like code 100 rail.

After that it's a good mech we can use for various locos and finally freight cars.


That is not true. Tillig is only one of the manufacturers. And it is code 83, not 100!
Kuehn is code 70
Filigran is code 60
The market for a prototypical track system is very limited, even in Europe! But it can be relatively easily modified to U.S. prototypes. If Filigran's rail fasteners are not acceptable for U.S. layouts then we need those small pieces with spikes instead of bolts. That would do. The ties can be laser-cut. I believe that we can live with Filigran's fasteners for the turnouts? Changing those to spike version would be more expensive.
Anyway, I think that starting with prototypical track would be an overkill.
Let more new people come to the scale first. Tillig or Kuehn track system may be good enough for a starter set.
What we need the most is to increase the size of the market!

milwrd1 wrote:I believe readily available flex track with a code 70 or 60 rail would be a very desirable item.


Both are available.
Code 70 from Kuehn (RTR)
Code 60 from Filigran (kit)
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Re: New Member

Postby milwrd1 » Wed Mar 05, 2014 12:39 pm

areibel wrote:Track would be nice but that is a big project to tackle unless you can cut a 3'flextrack base mold- if you can you would be everyone in TT's best friend!
I go with freight cars, myself. For modelling anything between the transition era and the piggyback/container trains we need boxcars! Other than the Gold Coast cars there isn't a good 40 foot car available, like a PS-1. And 50 footers are really bleak, there are some ancient kits from HP and the ones Rob is offering (Railbox and waffle sides), but again the standard run of the mill boxcars that were common from 1960-1980 aren't available.
There are several two bay hoppers available, but only one three bay. Gondolas aren't too bad, between Rob and ConducTTor's versions, flats and tanks are getting better but we could use almost anything!


Al - all of the above is TRUE. However, where you gonna run all those freight cars? I realize that one can always handlay track and switches. I understand the costs and issues associated with developing a line of track components. The issue of readily available to scale track components (including flex track, sectional track and switches) has been the thorn in the side of TT scale in North America for many years. I believe the lack of good "assembled" track is the reason the scale lost out in North America in the late 1950's and early 1960's. To attract new modellers, good assembled track components are essential. For North American TT modeling, TT scale will remain in the realm of the kit builders or scratchbuilders, (essentially as it has) without readily available, easy to assemble, track components. Very few beginning modelers (those new to model railroading) would want to get involved with TT if told they would have to scratchbuild / handlay track.
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Re: New Member

Postby j p » Wed Mar 05, 2014 12:47 pm

Btw, there is a very nice example of prototypical flex TT scale track on this board, including lose or missing spikes!
Is anything wrong with it?

http://www.ttnut.com/resources/image/3626
http://www.ttnut.com/resources/image/3632
http://www.ttnut.com/resources/image/3634
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Re: New Member

Postby areibel » Wed Mar 05, 2014 1:30 pm

Hi Ron,
I see what you're saying, but I didn't think Bernd was thinking in that large of a project when he asked his question (but he did ask!).
I assumed he was talking more along the projects that have popped up here, something one guy could turn out in his home shop and offer up.
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Re: New Member

Postby ConducTTor » Wed Mar 05, 2014 2:19 pm

@ j p

Readily available is the key for the US. Tillig is the only track available from a US distributor and often times there is a wait for the pieces you need. While Kuhn and Filligran are better, they have to be ordered from Europe - the average person doesn't want to have to do that.
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Re: New Member

Postby j p » Wed Mar 05, 2014 2:23 pm

ConducTTor wrote:@ j p

Readily available is the key for the US. Tillig is the only track available from a US distributor and often times there is a wait for the pieces you need. While Kuhn and Filligran are better, they have to be ordered from Europe - the average person doesn't want to have to do that.


Then a distributor is needed. That is more realistic than starting the production in U.S. from scratch.
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Re: New Member

Postby ctxmf74 » Wed Mar 05, 2014 4:30 pm

"The issue of readily available to scale track components (including flex track, sectional track and switches) has been the thorn in the side of TT scale in North America for many years.'

I agree, people new to the hobby are not going to want to handlay their track or to wait for track to be sent from Europe. If TT had an Atlas quality sectional/flextrack/turnouts system it would be a lot more user friendly. I can make my own track so more freight cars would interest me but for the good of the scale track would be my first choice. A nice selection of readily available track products along with the Saz model switcher and the Gold coast cars could be quite attractive to new modelers looking for something a bigger than N scale but more space efficient than HO scale.....DaveB
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Re: New Member

Postby ctxmf74 » Wed Mar 05, 2014 7:22 pm

" I haven't run across any type of track gauge, the NMRA type, the roller type and the 3 point type. Any one make those? "

They were available a couple of years ago . Took a long time to order one as the guy was hard to reach and seemed to travel a lot , might have been sold under "Coastal" name , IIRC there was a link on here or the yahoo TT site to the company. Would be very handy if Saz model could stock them to help the newbies get going....DaveB
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