Model techniques

Model techniques

Postby areibel » Fri Mar 28, 2014 7:59 am

After reading a lot of the latest banter how about instead of arguing about what's right and wrong why not start a thread about model techniques and how you could fix a foobie? I've had a couple ideas rattling around in my head that might help, and after seeing some of the work presented on here (like Marquette's BL and Milrd's SW) and I wouldn't mind learning more. Here are a couple off the top of my head-

Adding rivets- I can't take credit for coming up with this one, but it's one I want to try. By dipping a needle in ACC and touching it to your surface it will make a liquid bump. Hit it with some spray activator and it leaves a solid bump. A now deceased TT'er named Garn Smith told me about it, I haven't tried it yet but maybe it'll work? It seems that the hardest thing would be keeping them straight and spaced evenly, but it would be a whole lot cheaper than Archer rivets?

Etching. Anyone tried the toner transfer method? If you Google it you'll come up with all sorts of suggestions, and it looks like something that could be done at home fairly easily. You print your pattern onto shiny photo paper with laser printer toner, and transfer it onto a brass sheet with a home iron. Ingo's caboose kit features a Stanray (diagonal panel) roof that rendered very nicely, could a 40 or 50 foot boxcar roof be an easy project? Sand down the offending roof flat, make a thin etch and glue it right over top? I've gathered all the materials to try it (basically just muriatic acid and hydrogen peroxide), I have a laser printer so I'll be giving it a shot when it warms up a bit more.. I can think of a bunch of etched projects that would be useful in TT. An etched grille would make converting the Lionel F3 into an F7 pretty simple. And I'm taking the lazy way out- take an HP version and color it black with a marker. Scan it, reduce it and print onto photo paper- Might not work, but if it does!

Any others? I know there are enough talented people here we should be able to come up with some new ideas! Or even websites that offer tricks or tips, we need all the help we can get>
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Re: Model techniques

Postby scaro » Fri Mar 28, 2014 9:17 am

areibel wrote:
Adding rivets- I can't take credit for coming up with this one, but it's one I want to try. By dipping a needle in ACC and touching it to your surface it will make a liquid bump. Hit it with some spray activator and it leaves a solid bump. A now deceased TT'er named Garn Smith told me about it, I haven't tried it yet but maybe it'll work? It seems that the hardest thing would be keeping them straight and spaced evenly, but it would be a whole lot cheaper than Archer rivets?


Al, I was told about this by a British HO American modeler. I tried it, I must be a klutz ; I was unable to get them spaced even and each rivet the same size.

I rolled rivets into the back of paper with a Japanese tool which costs £5 and has several tooth spacings on its rolling wheels. It was a printed side for a Mississippi Central boxcar. Trying to get around the decal issue.

It worked better when I used only a little MEK to turn the perspex surface tacky to the touch and then laminated the paper on. MEK had to be used sparingly -it makes the ink run if you flood the paper. Annoying; maybe there's a way round that with different ink or paper.

Styrene sheet warped badly even when MEK was used sparingly. It warped even when I MEKed another sheet to the reverse side of the styrene, a technique which is supposed to stop the tendency for styrene to bow in one direction. Didn't work.

I have started to despair of styrene as a modelling material.

Thick perspex can be scored with a knife, snapped on a straight edge. Works, but not always. Another, better technique is to cut it slowly with a hacksaw and clean up rough edges after. Cutting it with a hobby knife is a good way to slice into your anatomy. Perspex suited more to smoothside, covered vehicles so good for boxcars, but not so for open hoppers.

Upside is one boxcar side is done, lettered, riveted and looked passably OK. Went to photo it but I've temporarily misplaced it.

Ben
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Re: Model techniques

Postby areibel » Fri Mar 28, 2014 10:34 am

I think MEK is the main component of Tenax and a couple other styrene welders, so I see where painting that onto a surface would cause warping- you'll soften the whole thing. Mr. Smith had an article in the Empire several years back where he described his method of bonding paper to styrene for buildings, I'll have to see if I can locate it but I think he applied paper to the plastic (I think cardstock would be too thick?) and then just dampened the paper with MEK. I've seen a couple examples of the same thing using ACC, where something like a roof panel on a diesel can be cut out and rivets embossed, then placed and saturated with ACC to bond it down. The ACC will actually harden the paper a bit as well, so the detail will hold better. If I ever get started back on my GP7/9 project that's what I'd like to try for the roof panels, then add fans from Miniatures by Eric to replace the ones I ground off. The HO guys are lucky enough to have etched plates to do this with, and Cannon & Co fans but we'll have to improvise!
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Re: Model techniques

Postby ctxmf74 » Fri Mar 28, 2014 1:30 pm

"It worked better when I used only a little MEK to turn the perspex surface tacky to the touch and then laminated the paper on. MEK had to be used sparingly -it makes the ink run if you flood the paper. Annoying; maybe there's a way round that with different ink or paper. '

I've glued paper embossed rivet strips onto O scale cars using ca glue. Seems to hold ok. For TT scale where the rivets are so small I think Archer rivets might be worth the cost, it pretty hard to emboss a TT scale rivet on a piece of paper narrow enough to look right. Unless they were large rivets I'd be inclined to not even bother adding them or to just make a suggestion of rivets by spotting them with a fine sharpie or the point of a scriber. Luckily modern era cars don't require as many rivets :>) ......DaveB
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Re: Model techniques

Postby milwrd1 » Fri Mar 28, 2014 6:57 pm

areibel wrote:After reading a lot of the latest banter how about instead of arguing about what's right and wrong why not start a thread about model techniques and how you could fix a foobie? I've had a couple ideas rattling around in my head that might help, and after seeing some of the work presented on here (like Marquette's BL and Milrd's SW) and I wouldn't mind learning more. Here are a couple off the top of my head-

>


Thanks for the compliment :thumbup:
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Re: Model techniques

Postby milwrd1 » Fri Mar 28, 2014 7:00 pm

areibel wrote:After reading a lot of the latest banter how about instead of arguing about what's right and wrong why not start a thread about model techniques and how you could fix a foobie?
>


Great idea for a thread :!: :!: Let's discuss the possible solutions to correct some of the issues with the foobies :!:
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Re: Model techniques

Postby milwrd1 » Fri Mar 28, 2014 7:03 pm

ctxmf74 wrote:"It worked better when I used only a little MEK to turn the perspex surface tacky to the touch and then laminated the paper on. MEK had to be used sparingly -it makes the ink run if you flood the paper. Annoying; maybe there's a way round that with different ink or paper. '

I've glued paper embossed rivet strips onto O scale cars using ca glue. Seems to hold ok. For TT scale where the rivets are so small I think Archer rivets might be worth the cost, it pretty hard to emboss a TT scale rivet on a piece of paper narrow enough to look right. Unless they were large rivets I'd be inclined to not even bother adding them or to just make a suggestion of rivets by spotting them with a fine sharpie or the point of a scriber. Luckily modern era cars don't require as many rivets :>) ......DaveB


I agree with Dave here. The Archer rivets may be pricey, but I believe they are worth the cost. The N scale rivets offered by Archer are probably close the TT scale size. TT scale rivets are pretty small!
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Re: Model techniques

Postby TiTan downunder » Sat Mar 29, 2014 7:16 am

Ben,

< Styrene sheet warped badly even when MEK was used sparingly. It warped even when I MEKed another sheet to the reverse side of the styrene, a technique which is supposed to stop the tendency for styrene to bow in one direction. Didn't work.

I have started to despair of styrene as a modelling material >

The best way to laminate styrene is to work from the same sheet. Cut in 1/2 and then glue facing sides together, lay on a flat surface and apply weight - a phone book or two works for me. In other words, hold your hands out, palm side up and put your hands together.

If you glue different thicknesses, the thicker sheet will override the thinner. Also remember, it has a " grain ", just like wood. This is why with thicker sheets ( 2mm / .080" and up ) you can score and snap easy in one direction but, will be much harder if you turn it through 90 deg to do a right angle cut.

Ian
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Re: Model techniques

Postby scaro » Sun Jun 01, 2014 12:39 pm

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Last edited by scaro on Sun Jun 01, 2014 12:55 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Model techniques

Postby scaro » Sun Jun 01, 2014 12:48 pm

this is a paper side. tried to roll and indent the rivets for this design of car, which are quite complicated, CGW would have to have had the most complex rivet pattern ... and simulate patched repairs to the lower car sides; on these early steel cars, the wood floor tended to trap moisture and the lower sides at the corners usually rusted out.

WP_20140601_006.jpg



as I look at it, I think I need to redo that door, a pity because it's a real bi-atch, to use the parlance of our times.
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