Model techniques

Re: Model techniques

Postby areibel » Sun Jun 01, 2014 2:08 pm

LOL! Is that styrene for the door Ben, or something else?
It reminds me of my experiment to recreate fluted passenger car sides. After looking closely at it I thought I could do it by bonding .020 styrene rod together and make a panel, then cast a thin sheet from resin to apply to the car. Well, the first attempt I had failed (wound up with one big long blob of styrene), as did several others! Needless to say I think I'm just going to wait for Rob and try to maintain my sanity..
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Re: Model techniques

Postby scaro » Sun Jun 01, 2014 2:20 pm

pretty awful, isn't it? i'm down on styrene generally. either doesn't stick at all, or it warps.

second attempt, hopefully a bit better. i don't know any other cars that had this door aside from CGW 1923 ARA cars, but sure there were.

WP_20140601_008.jpg


a bit of a tease for the foot fetishists, in the corner. ;-p

i don't know whether this technique is viable as a substitute for decals. looks OK from a distance but on the yahoo scratchbuilding forum, folk say that because expansion/contraction rates for plastic and paper are so different, that they will separate in time.

doesn't evergreen make a size of corrugated styrene that's suitable for TT fluted passenger cars?
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Re: Model techniques

Postby areibel » Sun Jun 01, 2014 3:05 pm

Hi Ben,
I've had the same problems with very thin styrene sheet. Actually I've had better luck with cutting a square of thin brass for the main door panel and then using a piece of cardstock bonded on with ACC. You might even be able to do it all out of cardstock, the ACC actually hardens it up well enough to hold rivets and scribed lines. On mine the technique worked but teh workmanship was off a bit, I didn't get the cuts the same so the door is a hair larger than the overlay. I still need to carve the doors off of a GC car , I think I can clean it up with a file and still use it.
I wasn't able to find anything from Evergreen to use for the passenger car sides, the smallest I've seen is .030. My next experiment with the .020 rod would have been to clamp both ends together, get them all aligned tightly together. Then you could suspend it with a small weight on the end and the apply a bit of Tenax. But it looks like Rob is solving the problem for me, and since I tend to be a bit lazy I can wait!
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Re: Model techniques

Postby scaro » Sun Jun 01, 2014 3:17 pm

al, how thick is what you call cardstock and how do rivets take to it? might be a better material. it's probably the case that I use styrene because it's all I know, but i'm realising that aside from things made by master modellers, I've seen precious few good models made from it. and a master modeller i am not.
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Re: Model techniques

Postby areibel » Sun Jun 01, 2014 3:31 pm

Hi Ben,
I usually use those 3" by 5" index cards. They're about a scale inch thick, and it's easy enough to bond two or three together with ACC or two sided tape to make them thicker (and they're dirt cheap!). Business cards work well too, if they're not the most modern ones (they seem to have some sort of plastic coating, I don't know how well they'd glue or hold paint). They're usually about .015 thick, so almost 2" in TT. And if you check out an art store they have thicker types as well.
It's a lot easier to work with than styrene, you can get a lot of the rough cutting with a pair of sharp scissors. You do need to use a sharp blade for the finish cuts or they'll be fuzzy, but if you take a card and just put a drop of ACC on the corner you can see the properties it us when dry and it's not bad. A friend of mine got me started on it, he would use them to make masters for his On3 stuff to cast copies, you can't use them for any major structure but if you build a form out of anything- wood, styrene or even brass then glue on an overlay to add detail.
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Re: Model techniques

Postby Marquette » Sun Jun 01, 2014 4:41 pm

What are yous using for gluing the styrene? I've worked with styrene down to .005" and thinner (by sanding .005" down) without issue. My current glue of choice is Humbrol's Precision Poly Cement in the yellow plastic bottle with the metal syringe-like tip. If I had to choose I would say styrene is by far my favourite material to work with.
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Re: Model techniques

Postby scaro » Sun Jun 01, 2014 6:36 pm

I've been using plastruct weld. maybe that is the issue but that is what plastruct recommend for their styrene. but it's certainly not good for gluing thin evergreen sheet.

i'm discouraged with the paper technique ... i can see it isn't going to work, unless there's some way of printing sides on a paper that's sharper and where the glue doesn't make the ink run.
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Re: Model techniques

Postby Marquette » Sun Jun 01, 2014 6:41 pm

I've never tried the Plastruct Weld but I've never had issue with either Humbrol or Testors cement with plastruct or evergreen stuff.
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Re: Model techniques

Postby scaro » Sun Jun 01, 2014 8:10 pm

thanks I will give them a go.
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Re: Model techniques

Postby milwrd1 » Mon Jun 02, 2014 6:40 pm

scaro wrote:I've been using plastruct weld. maybe that is the issue but that is what plastruct recommend for their styrene. but it's certainly not good for gluing thin evergreen sheet.

i'm discouraged with the paper technique ... i can see it isn't going to work, unless there's some way of printing sides on a paper that's sharper and where the glue doesn't make the ink run.


I haven't had a problem gluing styrene. I often use plastruct weld and testors liquid styrene cement. Both work fine. How old is the plastruct weld you are using? Could the bottle be old and lost some of the solvent (MEK??) from evaporation?
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