Interesting

Interesting

Postby Rob M » Thu May 04, 2017 10:09 pm

Saw a similar machine in Walmart today for $179

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0iIfrBeHe60

Don't remember how to do youtube here :wall:
Last edited by Rob M on Fri May 05, 2017 12:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Interesting

Postby ConducTTor » Thu May 04, 2017 10:46 pm

Wow that's really neat. The precision is most impressive.
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Re: Interesting

Postby Bernd » Fri May 05, 2017 7:49 am

Here's a discussion on the MRH forum about the Cricut machine. Some interesting view points both pro and con.

http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/25044

Personally I wouldn't own one. You need to be on the net to make it function. It is geared more toward scrap booking than anything else. I much prefer a CNC machine that runs without having to be connected to the internet to function. And I'm biased of course.

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Re: Interesting

Postby Rob M » Fri May 05, 2017 12:35 pm

I prefer to use a cnc as well, but not everyone is a crazy as us and will fork over a few thousand $$ for a machine they may or may not be able to figure out how to use. This seems like a simple machine that with a little creativity should give good results. These machines are knife cutters and work similar to laser cnc's

After a little researching, "Brother" has a line with a few better models, http://www.brother-usa.com/scanncut/
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Re: Interesting

Postby Bernd » Fri May 05, 2017 5:00 pm

Checked out the machines. They are also cloud based and they have their own software to run the cutter. You export a SVG file up to their site. It turns the SVG file into a FCM file the cutter can use. So you still need internet service. That's not a plus in my book, cheap or not for the machine. From what I read in the MRH forum thread it's a bit difficult to program for precision work. I understand that not every modeler will spend thousands of dollars to do what you and I do. If it works for the person that wants to use one, great.

One other thing, my opinion, it's not very versatile. I can cut many different materials and I can also set up the CNC from mill to a lathe. Something I haven't tried yet.

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Re: Interesting

Postby Richard-B » Sun May 07, 2017 12:12 am

Bernd wrote:Here's a discussion on the MRH forum about the Cricut machine. Some interesting view points both pro and con.http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/25044 <snip>
I've used a friend's Cricut machine to cut out shapes (e.g. window mullions...) in thin styrene... .010 if I recall...
The trick was to export the Adobe Illustrator file as an .SVG (Scalable Vector Graphic) file... which can be successfully imported into the Cricut.

You do upload it to the cloud to print... but at least all your actual creative work is still on the ground.
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Re: Interesting

Postby Bernd » Sun May 07, 2017 7:37 am

Richard-B wrote:I've used a friend's Cricut machine to cut out shapes (e.g. window mullions...) in thin styrene... .010 if I recall...


That one item seems to be what sells people on a Cricut.

The trick was to export the Adobe Illustrator file as an .SVG (Scalable Vector Graphic) file... which can be successfully imported into the Cricut.


To what resolution can a drawing be done in Adobe. Is one able to get .0005" accuracy such as can be attained by a CAD program? When programs such as Adobe Illustrator is mentioned I get the picture of a drawing program and not a CAD or drafting program. Plus there seems to be to much moving of files from one program to another to make it function. Perhaps I'm not understanding the how's and why's of an illustration program versus a drafting program. I do understand the fact people like a machine to do their cutting rather than using a hand tool for cutting straight lines.

You do upload it to the cloud to print... but at least all your actual creative work is still on the ground.


That is the biggest minus in my book. Again, it's my opinion and that's worth just as much as these words are worth on the screen. Also the medium I use, brass, steel, wood, etc, can't be cut on a Cricut. I can cut styrene on the mill or even acrylic. So the versatility of a CNC mill is far greater than a scrap book cutter. YMMV.

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Re: Interesting

Postby Richard-B » Sun May 07, 2017 10:35 am

Bernd wrote:To what resolution can a drawing be done in Adobe. Is one able to get .0005" accuracy such as can be attained by a CAD program?
0.0001 in (really!)
I use this accuracy all the time when working on car lettering.
On neat feature is that you can do math inside the dimensions toolbar, or even inch to mm conversion.
When programs such as Adobe Illustrator is mentioned I get the picture of a drawing program and not a CAD or drafting program.
Illustrator is a vector-based 'draw' program, as is CAD software.
Pluses: It handles fonts and irregular shapes really well, and can trace a high-contrast image;
Minus: It doesn't do automatic dimensioning.
It can also import/export and edit .DXF and .DWG files for standard CAD packages.

Inkscape https://inkscape.org is a free, open-source vector draw program (i.e. an AI equivalent) that I have heard good things about...

On the other hand; Adobe Photoshop is a bitmap (i.e. pixel-based) image program...
and (IMHO) quite worthless for high-resolution drawing...
Also the medium I use, brass, steel, wood, etc, can't be cut on a Cricut. I can cut styrene on the mill or even acrylic. So the versatility of a CNC mill is far greater than a scrap book cutter. YMMV.
Agree! ...friend has the Cricut, I have the mill!
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Re: Interesting

Postby Bernd » Sun May 07, 2017 2:43 pm

Richard,

Thanks for the schooling on Adobe Illustrator. I checked my CAD program, DraftSight 2017, and it has a resolution of 8 decimal places (0.00000001"). The Sherline is good for 0.0005". Close enough for model work. DraftSight I believe can do the same, change from mm to inches and visa-versa.

I've got Gimp loaded on the computer. Has a very high learning curve. I've read where Inkscape and Gimp are almost similar. Would like to get to use it better for decal work.

Back to building models.

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Re: Interesting

Postby Bernd » Mon May 08, 2017 3:14 pm

Here's an extensive thread on "A Guide to using the Silhouette Cameo Cutter". I believe the Silhouette is a competitive product to the Cricuit.

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/79025-a-guide-to-using-the-silhouette-cameo-cutter/page-1

You're going to need a six pack to read through 78 pages of the thread. :lol:

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