HP Catalogue 1948

HP Catalogue 1948

Postby rdikken » Sun Jan 12, 2014 5:42 pm

Something special:

I was lucky to buy a HP Products catalogue in a good condition. It has a bit a strange format, but I did manage to make a PDF document from it. It is for everyone to use and read on the next link:

http://www.zeuke-tt.com/en/us-models/

Click on the text in yellow and you will get it.

Ciao,
Rob
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Re: HP Catalogue 1948

Postby ctxmf74 » Sun Jan 12, 2014 6:41 pm

Thanks for posting the catalog. It's very interesting to read how far ahead of it's days HP thinking was. Those tie strips to build your own track would be a great thing to have today. ...DaveB
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Re: HP Catalogue 1948

Postby ConducTTor » Sun Jan 12, 2014 7:23 pm

I love the use of a cigarette for size comparisons LOL!
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Re: HP Catalogue 1948

Postby CaTTwoman281 » Sun Jan 12, 2014 7:29 pm

Definitely an interesting look at what may very well be the genesis of TT scale.
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Re: HP Catalogue 1948

Postby areibel » Sun Jan 12, 2014 7:48 pm

ConducTTor wrote:I love the use of a cigarette for size comparisons LOL!


Yeah, it's funny how that was a measurement standard! Things have changed!

And the HP flex track was a good idea in theory, but was a pain in practice! It used HP's own Ribbon Rail, and either sections of ripple tie base or flexible tie base in rolls. The rail mounted into a scored groove in the tie base, or it was supposed to. The bad thing is it wasn't tight enough to hold, but the tie base wouldn't take spikes well (and there wasn't much of a flange on the base anyway). You can get it all installed and try to move it a bit and it would pop the rail out. Or get a derailment and pop the rails out. Or look at it sideways and the rail would pop out! A couple companies made wooden base (Starline or Alco Models), it was much better but you still needed a few spikes on the curves to keep it together.
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Re: HP Catalogue 1948

Postby ctxmf74 » Sun Jan 12, 2014 8:08 pm

"the HP flex track was a good idea in theory, but was a pain in practice! "

I imagine someone could improve up the idea with today's materials and manufacturing standards. Central Valley makes some nice HO track and turnout tie bases. Ideally some entrepreneur would contact Micro Engineering and commission TT scale flextrack like others have done in the past for Proto 48 and S scale track. A line of readily available flextrack could do more for the growth of TT scale right now than additional models could. It's easier to get interested in buying equipment when one can buy track to run it on without relying on someone like Tillig in europe that doesn't seem to really care if we buy their stuff or not...DaveB
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Re: HP Catalogue 1948

Postby j p » Sun Jan 12, 2014 8:43 pm

areibel wrote:
ConducTTor wrote:I love the use of a cigarette for size comparisons LOL!


Yeah, it's funny how that was a measurement standard! Things have changed!

And the HP flex track was a good idea in theory, but was a pain in practice! It used HP's own Ribbon Rail, and either sections of ripple tie base or flexible tie base in rolls. The rail mounted into a scored groove in the tie base, or it was supposed to. The bad thing is it wasn't tight enough to hold, but the tie base wouldn't take spikes well (and there wasn't much of a flange on the base anyway). You can get it all installed and try to move it a bit and it would pop the rail out. Or get a derailment and pop the rails out. Or look at it sideways and the rail would pop out! A couple companies made wooden base (Starline or Alco Models), it was much better but you still needed a few spikes on the curves to keep it together.


The problems you describe might be caused by forgetting to glue it? When using the ripple tie base, part of the bottom of the profile is accesible from underside and can be glued there or a hole for a pin can be drilled into it if glue is not sufficient. If the tiebase was not glued to the trackbed, the grove in it would widen when inserting the rail profile because of the flexibility of the ripple tie base. Modern material would not help with this, you'd still need to glue it.
Despite of the problems, it was much better than Zeuke's U-profile track.

Anyway, if anyone is interested in the ripple tie base sections for HP track, let me know. I have an extra box of it.
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Re: HP Catalogue 1948

Postby scaro » Sun Jan 12, 2014 9:18 pm

Thank you Rob! Very interesting.
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Re: HP Catalogue 1948

Postby milwrd1 » Sun Jan 12, 2014 9:31 pm

ConducTTor wrote:I love the use of a cigarette for size comparisons LOL!


The 1948 HP TT catalog is a favorite, due to its' unique timetable format. I also like the use of colors and the photos of many of the engines which were in the development stage or "incomplete". Many of the engine boilers are plain (without the details added), specifically the models mentioned for 1949 delivery.

I also enjoyed the use of the cigarette for a size comparison (when showing the 0-6-0 boilers), another favorite photo is the one of a complete 0-6-0 (including tender) resting in someones' hand on page 14. This photo would be used many times in HP advertising in the years to come.
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Re: HP Catalogue 1948

Postby rdikken » Mon Jan 13, 2014 6:04 am

Reading this small strangly folded booklet, I have the feeling that Hal Joyce was a visionair. Not only the flex track, but the complete range of products he offered is unique. And did you see the sentence "to prevent waste . . . . keep this folder."? If I compare this with the first catalogue of Zeuke from 1958, it is much more sophisticated.

Question: was this HP's first catalogue?
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