Fort Langley station

Fort Langley station

Postby Arseny » Wed Apr 08, 2015 3:09 am

Well, everybody of us needs at least one station for the layout or diarama or even running trains on the table!
Of course, somebody can use small flagstop station from BTS, or try to find old Christoph/Coastal Engineering station on Ebay (I have one), or use Auhagen buildings, but it is not enough!
BTS flagstop station is too small, old pewter stations are too rough and hard to find, Auhagen buildings look too European-style, especially if you do not model New England!

Now we have true North American, high-quality, full-function station suitable both for Canada and USA - thanks CSD, thanks Inter-Action Enterprises! :clap:

Manufacturer's website: http://www.interactionhobbies.com/TT-Sc ... _p_66.html
Distributor's website: http://sazmodel.com/


I have assembled my Fort Langley station and I want to show it to you.

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Last edited by Arseny on Wed Apr 08, 2015 1:40 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Fort Langley station

Postby Arseny » Wed Apr 08, 2015 7:56 am

Historical review.

The Langley Station is a real railroad station.

322622802_846df7ea2c_b.jpg


It was built in 1915 for the new Canadian Northern Railway and became part of the Canadian National Railway system in 1918. It was expanded that year to better accommodate larger living quarters for the station agent. The station is one of 85 Third Class Stations built in Western Canada.

Langley_Train_Station.jpg


The design was one of the Canadian Northern Railways "third class" plans (plan 100-29) used by the CN until 1924. Plan 100-29 was the third of four "Third Class" station designs developed for the CNoR by influential architect Ralph Benjamin Pratt. Each of the "Third Class" stations designed by Pratt was distinguished by its hip roof - a unique feature that immediately branded the stations as CNoR constructions. The main floor of the building accommodated a waiting room and office, while the upper level contained living quarters for the stationmaster. The station also possessed a sizable, single storey wing that served as a baggage area.

Meeting-Creek-inside_s.jpg
Station agent room on the Meeting Creek station of the same design


The Langley Station was used full-time until 1972 when it was reduced to a flag stop, and passenger service was completely terminated in 1980. For a time the Station stood empty, but in 1983 it was moved to its present location and restored by the Langley Heritage Society in cooperation with the Township of Langley.

There were a lot of such station build from British Columbia on the west down to Minnesota, USA. Over 300 such stations were built totally.

The painting schemas could differ:

Meeting-Creek_s.jpg
2006727112331_station3.jpg


So, it is nice and very popular station building that can be used for modelling both Canadian and USA sites (at least in Minnesota)
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Re: Fort Langley station

Postby gerhard_k » Wed Apr 08, 2015 8:32 am

Arseny - you have done a beautiful job! And the historical info is interesting, too.

Any comments on the design of the kit, and how it went together?
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Re: Fort Langley station

Postby Arseny » Wed Apr 08, 2015 11:55 am

So, I started to build my station.
The kit components are laser-cut and engraved, made from stabilized resin impregnated craft paper (RICP) for crisp, high resolution detail.

The walls are very thin, so it would be better to glue some stripes of balsa or simply the matches inside the corners to keep them square and to the walls, from the inside, to keep them straight

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The door is separate part, but the details ("planks") are almost invisible after the painting. So I weathered it a little with a charcoal, by toothpick. Dip a toothpick into crushed charcoal and move it along the "planks".

Window frames are very thin and delicate. It is nice, but they can be cracked very easily. Be careful!
When you glue the frame into the window opening, align it to the top, to leave space for the sill.

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I did not like green trim, so I decided to use dark-wine-red trim.
This sheet is glossy, so it is necessary to choose the paint carefully. My paint soiled everything around when I tried to glue these parts at the first time.

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Basic structure. The floor is provided, so you are to decide, if you want to build interior (tables, chairs, writing-decks, etc) and/or light inside the station.
As for me, I did not build interior, but put LED inside.
Last edited by Arseny on Wed Apr 08, 2015 12:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Fort Langley station

Postby Arseny » Wed Apr 08, 2015 12:04 pm

pic7.jpg


The roof was complicated for me.
You are to put all parts just-in-place very accurately. If you make any mistake, it will cause problems when you lay the shingle panels.

As for me, I was not too accurate. :(
I had to sand the roof panels, but when I started to lay the shingles, they did not fit well :wall:

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I cut them by knife, but as a result I got some ugly gaps.

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Fortunately, there are some paper strip shingles in the kit, so I masked the gaps by these strips and then painted the roof grey.

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Shingle panels are 3D-engraved. Very nice!
Last edited by Arseny on Wed Apr 08, 2015 1:46 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Fort Langley station

Postby Arseny » Wed Apr 08, 2015 1:38 pm

Now, the roof is completed:

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Pay attention to the meeting-point of the freight shed roof and platform roof. Platform roof is made as single detail, so put the freight shed roof shingle panel a bit downward the roof, to overlap platform roof. Otherwise you will get a gap.

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Also, I've got some problem with a bay window. (To be more precise, it is avant-corps, risalit :snooty: )
Trim strips are provided to mask the joints of the walls. Usually, in other places, trim strips are glued to BOTH sides of the corner(s). But in this place it is almost impossible to put any strip to the side wall, due to the lack of space between side window and the corner. So, I've put trim strip on the front wall only and painted the joint point of the corner white.
But you shoult better paint it BEFORE you glue the trim strip, otherwise you must use VERY small brush!

pic14.jpg


Now, the chimneys. They are very nice.
I've painted them black from the inside, but the material was thin, so the black paint leaked through the mortar lines. But it was quite the thing! It is a chimney, so it must be smoked and sooted!

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Now, the building is ready. I've assembled the back door deck and stairs, and also the platform to put it to the front side.

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THE END.

But I plan to add some adv posters to the walls, train schedule, "waiting room" plate, and maybe vending machine for soft drinks on the platform?

I wonder, if you like my painting scheme, with dark wine red trim?
Or maybe it is too flashy, too garish?.. :think:
Last edited by Arseny on Wed Apr 08, 2015 1:48 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Fort Langley station

Postby MacG » Wed Apr 08, 2015 1:42 pm

Nice work, Arseny!

It is bad, that the model has stone walls at the 2nd floor. Stone above wood - what a mess. A big static problem at a real house. That goes better!
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Re: Fort Langley station

Postby Arseny » Wed Apr 08, 2015 1:51 pm

MacG wrote:It is bad, that the model has stone walls at the 2nd floor. Stone above wood - what a mess. A big static problem at a real house. That goes better!


I quite agree with you.
It looks like real house is all wooden. What a mistake.
Maybe it is not brick/stone, just very short boards? :wtf: :lol:
But it seems to me that station from Manitoba has the same wall pattern...

2006727112331_station3.jpg
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Re: Fort Langley station

Postby CN-TT » Wed Apr 08, 2015 2:06 pm

That looks great, well done :thumbup: I also like the dark wine red color.
I believe the 2nd floor walls are just covered with shingles (the bigger ones!)
You gotta do much more than believe if you really wanna change things!

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Re: Fort Langley station

Postby CSD » Wed Apr 08, 2015 2:45 pm

Looks great! Yes, the second floor is covered with shingles.

Just to add to your description, this is a class 3 Canadian Northern Railway station and were built throughout western Canada. They became Canadian National Railway stations when a number of lines were nationalized by the government. Over the years they received many modifications, such as the second floor on this model. The one in my home town, St. Albert, got an extension to the baggage area and, like all prairie stations, was stuccoed in the 1920's/1930's.
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