Boxcar Types by Railroad

Re: Boxcar Types by Railroad

Postby Marquette » Tue Mar 22, 2011 12:14 pm

Ben: It's all a matter of checking the prototype - some cars never received steel running boards and kept the wooden roof walks all the way to the end, including many of the 1937 cars. There's nothing wrong with wooden running boards - it's just that we need /both/ wooden and metal...

Alex: not exactly. The AAR mechanical designtation for a plain old run of the mill boxcar is XM, then there are others like XAP and XAR (both automobile cars), XI (insulated boxcar) etc. But these are blanket designations - an X29, a Fowler and a 1937 AAR car are all XM...
#include <std/disclaimer.h>
User avatar
Marquette
 
Posts: 2155
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2009 8:16 pm

Re: Boxcar Types by Railroad

Postby ConducTTor » Tue Mar 22, 2011 12:21 pm

Marquette wrote: an X29, a Fowler and a 1937 AAR car are all XM...


Aha - that's exactly what I was trying to figure out. :thumbup:
My website: https://www.ttnut.com
It's the website you're already on. But if you want to be even more on it, click the link.
User avatar
ConducTTor
Site Admin
 
Posts: 8687
Images: 13
Joined: Sat May 23, 2009 4:52 pm
Location: Atlanta GA USA

Re: Boxcar Types by Railroad

Postby Marquette » Tue Mar 22, 2011 12:32 pm

Keep in mind, there /can/ be exceptions... ;)

For example: there were X29s (and 1937 cars, and others) fitted with steam lines etc for service as express-package cars in passenger trains - these were designated BX. Or, a 1937 car fitted with racks for auto parts becomes an XAP...

This is worth a read: http://www.nakina.net/other/aartype.html
#include <std/disclaimer.h>
User avatar
Marquette
 
Posts: 2155
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2009 8:16 pm

Re: Boxcar Types by Railroad

Postby scaro » Tue Mar 22, 2011 1:01 pm

Marquette wrote:Ben: It's all a matter of checking the prototype - some cars never received steel running boards and kept the wooden roof walks all the way to the end, including many of the 1937 cars. There's nothing wrong with wooden running boards - it's just that we need /both/ wooden and metal...

...


yep. if i modelled a bit of US, i might either do a combination of G&F and the 'pidcock roads' (probably based on moultrie, GA where the two met) or something based on getting the maximum number of variations of the upcoming GP38-2, ie, a couple of the SR high hood versions and SCL and L&N low nose versions at some kind of interchange in the 1970s. SR was pretty up to the mark with their rolling stock so you'd likely expect all steel running boards - or none, as the 70s wore on.

even the decrepit georgia northern used metal mesh on one of their two captive boxcars according to available shots. G&F's older wood boxcars maybe had wood running boards but you'd need some metal ones in the late 50s - early 60s era. i suspect all wood running boards in that timeframe would be unusual, even in a relative backwater like south georgia.

ben
scaro
 

Re: Boxcar Types by Railroad

Postby Marquette » Tue Mar 22, 2011 1:51 pm

Well, to a degree, but not necessarily. Just a quick check in the Seaboard Air Line colour guide to freight and passenger equipment:

p38, SAL 17161 (class B6), photo Bartow, Florida, February 1975 - wood running boards still.

p39, SAL 18229 (class B6), photo Trilby, Fla, February 1975 - wood running boards still.

p40, SAL 18923 (class B6), photo Hamlet, NC, June 1974 - wood rb still.

As far as I could gather, CN's 1937 AAR cars, for example, that were delivered with wooden running boards, were never switched over.

Re the G&F or other old and decrepit cars, keep in mind that steel running boards were introduced in the late 1920s or early 1930s, so by the 1950s a car could be in really rubbish condition and still have steel walkways nevertheless. It's fairly safe to use whatever was used on the car as-built. If a car was rebuilt, like say a USRA double-sheathed car into a steel-sheathed car, then it's very possible they received steel in the rebuild, but not always.

The Southern still had quite a lot of wood-sheathed cars running around in the 1950s, including still pretty big numbers of the 36' SU type with truss rod underframes; the wood-sheathed cars appear to have had wooden running boards to the end, while the steel cars all appear to have steel rb in the photos I have, many of them builder's shots.

The Pere Marquette's last boxcar series built with wooden running boards was the 93000-93399 series of 40' double-door autoboxes built in 1936; near as I can tell, these had the wood all the way to the end; the C&O retired these cars in 1975 (I don't think they ever received a C&O number series, though, retaining the PM lettering to the end).

Since I've found so little evidence of a car being built with wooden running boards but receiving steels ones later on without undergoing a major rebuild, my "policy" has been to go with whatever the latest available photo of the car type shows.

You'd need some metal running boards even in the 1930s, so yeah, it's /definitely/ something we need. Very close to home for me is the fact that the PM's 1937 AAR cars were built with Apex running boards.

Buuuut, this thread is getting TOTALLY hijacked! :P

I'm off to help my dad with stuff, but when I get home tonight I will bring this thread back on track with more Pennsy stuff!
#include <std/disclaimer.h>
User avatar
Marquette
 
Posts: 2155
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2009 8:16 pm

Re: Boxcar Types by Railroad

Postby Marquette » Wed Mar 23, 2011 2:47 am

X36
PRR 103500.jpg

Number series: 103500 (1)

One-off "series" - a very interesting car, one of my favourites of the Pennsy's experimental cars (one I'll probably end up modelling, eventually).

X37
PRR 65640.jpg

Number series: 65400-66399 (992)

Of any, the X37 is probably the closest of the Pennsy boxcars to the 1937 AAR design. They were built in 1939, so after the 1937 standard was introduced, but the "Standard Railroad of the World" (as the Pennsy liked to call themselves) did stuff their own way (leading to the joke that the Pennsy was the "Standard Railroad of Altoona" - the town in Pennsylvania where the PRR had its headquarters).

How would I tackle modelling an X37 using the Gold Coast kit? Well, the biggest difference is in the 7' doors, the ends and the side sills. In reverse order: the tabs on the sills of the X37 are shaped somewhat differently from those on the 1937 design; this could probably be fixed well enough with some reshaping, filing and bits of styrene as needed. The ends on the X37 are 5/5 Dreadnaughts, whereas on the GC car they're 4/5 Dreadnaughts. Shouldn't be /too/ difficult to add an extra rib. (Though I do have it in mind to try and make some conversion parts for the GC kit; I'd started on a master for Buckeye ends for the Erie's 1937 cars, but am thinking now to try doing it via Shapeways, we'll see). The doors are probably the most difficult part, and I'm not entirely sure how I'd tackle it. But probably what I'd do would be surgery on the sides using two sets of sides, cutting and splicing as needed to extend the door by one foot in width. Short of that though, the only other thing I can think of is to live with the 1' inaccuracy in the door...

X37a
Number series: 66400-66899 (497)

Unfortunately I don't have a photo, but I do have a diagram and dimensional info: this is a 12' double-door version of the X37. The way the doors seem to be arranged would make it easier to kitbash one of these using two GC kits than the single-door X37 - just cut out the doors from one pair of sides and attach them to the other pair to the left of the existing doors. Add some runners and it's done. After that, the ends and sills shouldn't be a problem at all. But before anyone goes ahead and try this, let me confirm that it's indeed two 6-foot doors, and not a 9' and a 3' door like on the X37b...

X37b
PRR 64732.jpg

Number series: 64400-65399 (991), 66900-67399 (493)

Different from the X37 especially in regards to the side sill, and this has Superior doors instead of Youngstown doors. Note the door-and-a-half arrangement (one 9' and one 3' door). Further, this is 4" taller than the others...

X38
PRR 58457.jpg

Number series: 58100-58799 (535), 73699-76099 (1599)

50' version of the X37a.

X38a
Number series: 57800-58099 (298), 76100-76399 (297)

Same as X38 but with end doors.

X38b
PRR 119991.jpg

Number series: 119991 (1)

Single car "series", built 1942. It may seem anachronistic to have built a single-sheathed car in 1942, but that came about because the war effort needed the steel - this is the 50' version of the "War Emergency" design. Not many of the 50' WE cars were built, but quite a few were built of the 40' version (oddly enough, mostly for roads in the South).

(more later)
#include <std/disclaimer.h>
User avatar
Marquette
 
Posts: 2155
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2009 8:16 pm

Re: Boxcar Types by Railroad

Postby Arseny » Wed Mar 23, 2011 4:38 am

The ends on the X37 are 5/5 Dreadnaughts


Please explain: what does it mean - "Dreadnaughts" ?
User avatar
Arseny
 
Posts: 2724
Joined: Fri Jul 03, 2009 4:42 am
Location: Saint-Petersburg, Russia

Re: Boxcar Types by Railroad

Postby Marquette » Wed Mar 23, 2011 9:25 am

Arseny wrote:
The ends on the X37 are 5/5 Dreadnaughts


Please explain: what does it mean - "Dreadnaughts" ?


Pressed-steel ends with ribs of that design had the trade-name "Dreadnaught". There were a number of other designs, too - Hutchins, Murphy, Vulcan, Buckeye, Deco, etc.

5/5 means the end has two panels with 5 ribs on each; 4/5 means two panels, with four ribs on the upper panel and 5 ribs on the lower panel.
#include <std/disclaimer.h>
User avatar
Marquette
 
Posts: 2155
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2009 8:16 pm

Re: Boxcar Types by Railroad

Postby scaro » Wed Mar 23, 2011 10:48 am

i expect it refers to the shape of the pressings, which look like the hull of the warships of that type from above.
scaro
 

Re: Boxcar Types by Railroad

Postby Marquette » Wed Mar 23, 2011 8:17 pm

Ben: I never thought of that, but now that you mention it, it kinda does make sense...
#include <std/disclaimer.h>
User avatar
Marquette
 
Posts: 2155
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2009 8:16 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Prototypes / Models

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest