a couple of good NZ120 links

a couple of good NZ120 links

Postby scaro » Tue Jul 21, 2009 4:19 pm

Hi

TT is a big deal in New Zealand and here are links to a couple of sites, a bulletin board for the scale (they call it NZ120 as everything runs on 9mm track- NZ railways are 3'6") and a blog that gets updated almost daily and which has hundreds of good modelling ideas.

http://www.nz120.org/

http://motoriseddandruff.blogspot.com/

Cheers

Ben
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Re: a couple of good NZ120 links

Postby jmass » Tue Jul 21, 2009 5:16 pm

hey scaro, are those locos true tt lenght and width. the look more liuke us proto types than anything else ive seen. do you know the name of the manufacturer? thanks
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Re: a couple of good NZ120 links

Postby scaro » Tue Jul 21, 2009 6:03 pm

They are certainly TT as they are 1:120 scale, and as far as I know they are prototypical length and width. They run on N scale mechanisms as 9mm track in TT scale is equivalent to 3'6". This scale is a lot more vibrant than 'standard gauge TT' as there is no problem getting mechanisms at all.

They would be a lot smaller than most US locomotives as NZ diesels are about 75% of the size of US ones. The reason they look like US locos is that they are export GM and GEs and so there are a lot of similarities.

In terms of actual physical size, ie, what you'd hold in your hand, a NZR DC loco in TT is about the same size as an N scale SD35.

Ben
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Re: a couple of good NZ120 links

Postby ConducTTor » Wed Jul 22, 2009 9:17 pm

So scaro, basicaly it's the same thing as HOn3 being able to run on TT scale track?
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Re: a couple of good NZ120 links

Postby scaro » Tue Aug 04, 2009 12:17 pm

Not sure I get you.

HOn3 runs on 10.5mm track ... ie 3' at 3.5mm/ft. 'Standard gauge' TT track is 12mm gauge.

NZ120 or TTn3 1/2 does what Sn3 1/2 does. It takes advantage of a popular modelling scale (in this case N scale) for mechanisms and track and then enlarges the scale, so that the trains running on the 9mm gauge track are a bit bigger and the track at the larger scale scales out narrower, ie, 3'6" instead of standard gauge.

TT probably didn't exist in NZ until N appeared in the early 70s.

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Re: a couple of good NZ120 links

Postby ConducTTor » Tue Aug 04, 2009 6:13 pm

Hmmm, you're right. HOn3.5 (not HOn3) is 12mm.....

So what I meant was, NZ120 basically uses available N scale rail since it fits perfectly with the prototype. Just as HOn3.5 would use TT scale rail.
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Re: a couple of good NZ120 links

Postby scaro » Wed Aug 05, 2009 6:42 am

Yeah that's it.

When you consider narrow gauge modelling, you have two ways to go, which both have upsides and downsides.

1. You can either use an existing scale and narrow the wheels and mechanisms (not always easy). This is the best option if your narrow gauge trains run alongside standard gauge ones, or if the same locos and stock work on narrow and wider gauges. So, for example, HO trains with HOn3 as occurred in the US or HO with HOn3 and HOn3 1/2 in South Australia, where the 3'6" interchanged a lot with broad and/or standard gauge.

2. Where the narrow gauge system is isolated, say, on an island like New Zealand, or doesn't interchange with a wider gauge to any extent, it's often easier to just use the mechanisms of a popular scale like HO or N and just upsize the scale, so that what was standard gauge track is now narrow gauge. This is what Sn3 1/2 in New Zealand and Australia, 4mm scale in Tasmania and NZ120 do. The advantage for a modeller is that if you have some standard gauge models in addition to your narrow gauge stuff, they will run on the same layout. You sometimes face an issue with sleeper spacing and width, the size of bogies and wheels, and buildings etc, but it is surprising what people can get away with. In NZ it works particularly well because locos and wagons have quite short bogies, so commercial N can be adapted easily to TT.

Looking at it from a broad gauge perspective, the same principles apply.

So in theory you could select a popular track gauge and downsize the scale, though it is done very rarely. But some modellers of Indian and Spanish railways argue that the best scale for modelling broad gauge is 3mm/ft. Why? Because Indian and Iberian broad gauge is 5'6".

What gauge is 5'6" at 3mm/ft scale?

Why . . . 16.5mm. Quite handy.

Ben
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Re: a couple of good NZ120 links

Postby Zs12 » Fri Apr 23, 2010 11:55 am

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Re: a couple of good NZ120 links

Postby areibel » Fri Apr 23, 2010 4:03 pm

ConducTTor wrote:So scaro, basicaly it's the same thing as HOn3 being able to run on TT scale track?

That actually used to be pretty common.
Back in olden times, a lot of guys that wanted to run HOn3 but didn't want to hand lay track and scratchbuild mechanisms would use off the shelf TT track and mechanisms. Even Kemtron sold some of their locomotives that way, with an HO scaled body. You could take an HP 2-8-0, build a cab and change the pilot- Voila! It must have died off quickly when real HOn3 became available, but I've gotten stuff off of Ebay several times that was listed as HOn3 that was actually TT running gear under HO sized equipment.
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Re: a couple of good NZ120 links

Postby scaro » Sun Apr 25, 2010 5:05 am

So that would be more or less H0n3 1/2 by default, ie, a way to model 3'6" prototypes.

H0n3 1/2 started in Australia in the 1960s, and it was all down to TT. As part of the Commonwealth, with favourable trading preferences for UK goods, Triang TT3 was cheap and available. Model trains in those days were more of a kid's thing and much cheaper; my local newsagent even sold a few N gauge train sets.

Triang's 'Brush' diesel in particular was a favourite, as it had a robust & self contained three axle power truck able to be used for a variety of local prototype models. TT3 underframes were right for Australian 4 wheel narrow gauge stock. When Triang stopped TT3, H0n3 1/2 went into abeyance for years.

The Brits did more or less the same thing as the US for 3', but with a more accurate result in track gauge - using Triang and other 12mm gauge TT mechs to model the 3' lines of Ireland, Isle of Man etc, to 4mm scale. It's called 00n3.

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